MOV063: “How about at hot cup of freedom?”

In this 63rd reel of COL Movies, the boys head back to 2007 to check out the film adaptation of the off-broadway revue, “Naked Boys Singing!” After seeing more than enough full frontal nudity, they head to the theater to find out if “Captain America: The First Avenger” lives up to the hype. From there, they head to the moon with the “who the hell knows if it will actually ever be released” horror flick, “Apollo 18”. They also talk about JJ Abrams’ upcoming projects, provide updates on ”Oz, The Great and Powerful” and “Superman”, as well as discuss…hold your breath…”Machete” sequels? Really? Welcome to COL Movies…now how about a hot cup of freedom?

News:

  • JJ Abrams is working on Star Trek 2? Most definitely, but don’t count on it being released in June 2012
  • Abrams has returned from his post-Super 8 vacation and is committed to directing Star Trek 2, so committed that he’s working with writers Roberto Orci, Alex Kurtzman and Damon Lindelof to shape up the script
  • G.I. Joe 2: Retaliation has been moved to its release spot of June 29, 2012
  • Star Trek 2, no official release date set now, but don’t expect it before Dec 2012 or Summer 2013
  • Full synopsis for “Oz, The Great and Powerful” released
  • “Oz The Great and Powerful” imagines the origins of L. Frank Baum’s beloved character, the Wizard of Oz. When Oscar Diggs (James Franco), a small-time circus magician with dubious ethics, is hurled away from dusty Kansas to the vibrant Land of Oz, he thinks he’s hit the jackpot—fame and fortune are his for the taking—that is until he meets three witches, Theodora (Mila Kunis), Evanora (Rachel Weisz) and Glinda (Michelle Williams), who are not convinced he is the great wizard everyone’s been expecting. Reluctantly drawn into the epic problems facing the Land of Oz and its inhabitants, Oscar must find out who is good and who is evil before it is too late. Putting his magical arts to use through illusion, ingenuity—and even a bit of wizardry—Oscar transforms himself not only into the great and powerful Wizard of Oz but into a better man as well.
  • Never Before seen Superman Returns Opening now online
  • 5 Minute sequence cost an estimated 10 Million
  • Shows Superman in a crystalline spaceship exploring the remains of Krypton

  • Machete sequels revealed at SDCC
  • Machete Kills
  • Machete Kills again! …. in space!
  • “Both ‘Machete’ sequels have been greenlit,” says Rodriguez, though he added that the first one is currently the only one guaranteed to have a full-length film involved. The third will exist (for the time being) only in trailer form.
  • Rodriguez promises that it will include space babes and a lightsaber style weapon.

The Past: Naked Boys Singing!
Rotten Tomatoes: 64% Fresh, 53% Audience

Directors: Robert Schrock, Troy Christian

Starring: Andrew Blake Ames, Jason Currie and Marlene Fisher

Trivia:

  • Adaptation of a 1998 off-broadway play of the same name.

Talking Points:

  • What did ya think?
  • Debate over off-broadway versus movie version
  • Where are the bears?

What We’ve Learned:

  • I’m a perky little porn star.
  • I beat my meat.

Trailer:

Recommendations:
Jeff: Being a theatre person, the nudity didn’t do anything for me, it was just part of the act. I do enjoy myself a revue but not sure it’s for everything due to the gay themes and nudity.
Ray: I prefer my musicals to have a more cohesive narrative, I realize this is a revue, which I’ve never really been fond of. The nudity is somewhat amusing at first, but once that has worn off, the rest of it doesn’t hold my attention.
Steve: The songs are catchy and cute. The nudity didn’t do a whole lot for me the first time I saw this…and wasn’t a whole lot different the second time around. It is unique and would be fun to watch other people’s reactions though!

Intermission: Flickchart

The Present:Captain America: The First Avenger
Rotten Tomatoes: 76% Fresh, 84% Audience

Director: Joe Johnston

Starring: Chris Evans, Hugo Weaving, Hayley Atwell, Tommy Lee Jones

Trivia:

  • Jon Favreau was originally chosen by Marvel Studios to direct this film, but he chose to direct Iron Man. Nick Cassavetes, was also considered to direct this film, and had been set as a director for Iron Man in December 2004.
  • Despite being “The First Avenger”, it is the last solo Avenger film to be released before the team-up film, The Avengers.
  • According to producer Avi Arad: “The biggest opportunity with Captain America is as a man ‘out of time’, coming back today, looking at our world through the eyes of someone who thought the perfect world was small-town America. Sixty years go by, and who are we today? Are we better?”
  • Joe Johnston was chosen as the film’s director for his work on the period adventure films The Rocketeer and October Sky.
  • Louis Leterrier viewed some of the concept art for the film, and was impressed enough to offer his services, but Marvel Studios turned him down. However, his film The Incredible Hulk features a small appearance by Captain America: a deleted scene set in the Arctic features his body hidden in a slab of ice.
  • Screenwriter David Self, who wrote a draft of the script, claimed Captain America was his favorite childhood superhero: “My dad told me I could one day be Captain America.”
  • Sam Worthington and Will Smith were in early talks for the role of Captain America. Later on Garrett Hedlund, Channing Tatum, Scott Porter, Mike Vogel, Sebastian Stan, Chris Evans, Wilson Bethel, John Krasinski, Michael Cassidy, Chace Crawford and Jensen Ackles were on the final shortlist for the role. Kellan Lutz, Ryan Phillippe and Alexander Skarsgård carried out auditions, but ultimately the role went to Chris Evans.
  • Alice Eve and Keira Knightley were considered for the role of Peggy Carter. Emily Blunt turned down the role.
  • Tommy Lee Jones who plays Colonel Phillips in this film, also appeared as Two-Face/Harvey Dent in Batman Forever. Both Captain America and Batman faced off in the Marvel vs. DC crossover in 1996.
  • This is the fifth live-action adaptation of the superhero. The first was the serial Captain America; the second was the TV movie Captain America and its sequel Captain America II: Death Too Soon; and the fourth was the theatrical film Captain America.
  • Chris Evans was attracted to the role of Captain America by its character: “Even if it wasn’t a comic book. I think the story of Steve Rogers is great. He’s a great guy. Even if it was just a script about anybody, I would probably want to do it. It wasn’t necessarily about the comic itself. He’s a great character to play; he just happens to be a comic book character.”
  • Hugo Weaving based the Red Skull’s accent on renowned German filmmakers Werner Herzog and Klaus Maria Brandauer.
  • To prepare for her role as Peggy Carter, Hayley Atwell trained six days a week.
  • Originally cameo appearances were planned in the film for James Logan Howlett (Wolverine) and Erik Lensherr (Magneto), who were present during World War II (Logan was a soldier and Lensherr was a prisoner of war). These cameos were scrapped due to rights issues.
  • Chris Evans seventh comic book movie after the two Fantastic Four movies, TMNT (2007) Push (2009)The Losers, and Scott Pilgrim vs. the World.
  • The final Paramount Pictures film produced with Marvel Studios. Disney bought the rights to The Avengers and Iron Man 3.
  • Chris Evans declined the role three times before accepting the part. After that, he had a meeting with the director and the producers who convinced him to take the role.
  • Originally cameo appearances were planned in the film for Namor the Sub-Mariner, the Prince of Atlantis, but this was scrapped.
  • Sebastian Stan was considered for the role of Captain America, but got the role of Bucky instead.
  • Hayley Atwell based her performance as Peggy Carter on Ginger Rogers: “She can do everything Captain America can do, but backwards and in high heels.”
  • To prepare for his role as Bucky, Sebastian Stan watched many World War II films/documentaries, and drew inspiration from Band of Brothers.
  • Stanley Tucci took the role of Dr. Erskine because the role enabled him to use a German accent, which he always wanted to do.
  • The film was originally meant to be a standalone film, but after Joss Whedon was hired to direct The Avengers he was given a copy of the film’s script and made a few rewrites to tie it in to the Marvel Cinematic Universe: “I just got to make some character connections. The structure of the thing was really tight and I loved it, but there were a couple of opportunities to find his voice a little bit – and some of the other characters – and make the connections so that you understood exactly why he wanted to be who he wanted to be. And progressing through the script to flesh it out a little bit.”
  • Joe Simon, who created the “Captain America” comic in 1941 (before Stan Lee revived it in 1964), was approached to make a cameo appearance in the film.
  • Joe Johnston, the director of “Captain America: The First Avenger”, also directed “The Rocketeer”. In The Rocketeer, the hero, Cliff Secord, finds a rocket pack created by Howard Hughes, thus becoming the Rocketeer. In Captain America: The First Avenger, Captain America obtains his iconic shield from Howard Stark, a character closely based on Howard Hughes.
  • Contrary to popular belief, a body double was not used for Chris Evans for the scenes when he was skinny. The filmmakers had originally planned to hire a body double and superimpose Evans’ face onto the double’s body, but ultimately scrapped the idea since director Joe Johnston claimed that Evans moved in a unique way and that no body double could replicate his movements. Ultimately, the filmmakers utilized digital technology to “shrink” Evans down, essentially erasing portions of his physique, until they came up with what the filmmakers called “Skinny Steve”. Over 250 shots were filmed like this, and because the shrinking process left empty space in the background, many of the scenes had to filmed in front of a green screen so that they could superimpose the backgrounds back into the scene.
  • The Captain America comic book shown in the movies bears the cover of the actual Captain America #1 released in 1941.
  • Captain America’s special forces unit he assembles and leads is an amalgamation of the characters of Marvel Comics’ World War II period titles. These are the 1960s war title, “Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos” about an elite special forces infantry unit and the 1970s “The Invaders,” about a superhero team operating during the war under the command of Captain America. The contributions of the former title include most of the soldier characters, while the latter includes Captain America, Bucky and James Montgomery Falsworth, who appears in the comic book as the British superhero, Union Jack.
  • In the exhibition, there is a mannequin in a red jumpsuit under a glass dome. That is a reference to the android, the original Human Torch, the first superhero created by Timely Comics, which eventually became Marvel Comics.
  • The Red Skull (Hugo Weaving) searches for a powerful artifact, the Cosmic Cube. In Transformers, Weaving voiced the villain Megatron, who also searched for a similar cosmic cube-shaped relic (the AllSpark).
  • Samuel L. Jackson filmed a scene for this movie in New York City’s Time Square which serves as a scene that preludes The Avengers
  • Captain America from 1979

Talking Points:

  • Wilhielm Screams
  • Chris Evans
  • Tommy Lee Jones
  • Bucky’s role in movie
  • Merge of old and new (past & present collision)
  • Where was the steampunk?
  • The Choice to foreshadow the ending
  • The stuff after the ending
  • Are we ready for The Avengers now?

What We Learned:

  • You don’t win a war with niceness, you win it with guts
  • A weak man knows the value of strength and compassion
  • The moment you know whats going on inside a woman’s head is the moment your goose is truly cooked

Trailer:

Recommendations:
Jeff: Another fun Superhero movie. I really need to see it again to give a full recommendation but I liked it.
Ray: So far, my favorite superhero movie of the summer, lets hope they keep the momentum going with the avengers
Steve: Enjoyed it. Can’t say it was amazing or anything like that, but I enjoyed it. I like the character of Captain America, but am looking forward to seeing how he may evolve with Avengers. He’s just too perfect.

The Future: Apollo 18

Director: Gonzalo López-Gallego

Starring: Names have not yet been released

Trivia:

  • Speculation around the plot involves a government coverup of the Apollo 18 mission after parasitic lifeforms on the Moon discovered the crew and began to attack them. Much of the back-story remains unknown; however, the movie posters in English indicate the Russian KGB role in Soviet lunar conspiracy and the Russian movie posters show inscriptions in English suggesting an American government cover up in lunar conspiracy.
  • In the trailer, an American astronaut finds a dead cosmonaut and a Soviet LK Lander on the lunar surface.
  • Apollo 18 is currently scheduled for release on September 2, 2011. Originally scheduled for March 2011, the film’s release date was moved five times during the year (including to April 2011, January 2012, August 2011, and September 2, 2011).
  • The film’s trailer was attached to Scream 4.

Talking Points:

Summary:

Decades-old found footage from NASA’s abandoned Apollo 18 mission, where two American astronauts were sent on a secret expedition, reveals the reason the U.S. has never returned to the moon.

Trailers:
Original Trailer:


Newer Trailer:

Excitement:
Jeff: This could be interesting. I’m sure we’ll be watching this, I think you should too.
Ray: Yep, I dig on creepy space flicks.. I’m there.
Steve: Has me interested because I love space movies and close quarter scares. Hoping I’ll get to see some good stuff on the eventual DVD release about why it was changed…hopefully a first cut.

Coming Attractions:

The Past

The Present

The Future

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MOV062: “I know you are, but what am I?”

Take off those training wheels and go on a whimsical bike ride back to 1985 where we examine the silly campy and sometimes creepy Pee-Wee Herman in Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure. Was this Tim Burton / Danny Elfman debut a match made in heaven? or does it crash and burn in hell like a bad twisted sister video? Next the boys dissapperate to Hogwarts one last time to discuss the spectacle that is Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows Part 2. Does the film live up to expectations and end the franchise in a way fans of the movies and book series were hoping for? Or does the movie cast a killing curse on the future careers of its child actors? Next we bound into the future to take a look at the film Abduction, does twilight start Taylor Lautner have the chops to be an action star or will we be putting this one down with a silver bullet? All this and news about Dwarves, Kryptonians, Eco-Terrorists and Gunslingers on this reel of COL Movies! I know you are, but what am I?

News:

The Past: Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure (1985)
Rotten Tomatoes: 92% Fresh; 66% Audience

Director: Tim Burton
Starring: Paul Rubens, Elizabeth Daily, Mark Holton, Diane Salinger

Trivia:

  • Tim Burton’s Directorial Debut, Danny Elfman’s first film score.
  • Jan hooks improvised her dialogue for the Alamo scenes
  • During the magic shop scene, Mario shows Pee-wee heads of different sizes. The largest head that he shows Pee-wee last is actually Aleister Crowley.
  • The Drive-in sequence was filmed at the Studio Drive In, formerly located in Culver City CA. The Studio was built in the 1930s, and was the first Drive-in Theatre constructed in California. It served as a set for several films, including Grease. It was closed in 1993 and demolished in 1998. No trace of this Drive-in remains.

Talking Points:

  • Who does this appeal to OR was it supposed to appeal to when it came out?
  • Who even knew this was a Tim Burton film back in the day? I can totally see it now…but had no idea then.

What We’ve Learned:

  • Don’t cut the tags off your mattress
  • The Alamo doesn’t have a basement
  • Never let Pee-Wee drive your car
  • Convertibles have built in parachutes
  • You can’t just wish and hope for something to come true you have to make it happen
  • Tell em Large Marge sent ya!

Trailer:

Recommendations:
Jeff: This was a well put together movie. That being said, this was a complete waste of my time.
Ray: A film that combines the child like zaniness of Pee-Wee and the slight tinge of the bizarre ala Tim Burton and what do you get? A film you can’t go wrong with.
Steve: Pee Wee is Pee Wee. You either love him or hate him. I like the quotables and cameos in the movie, but don’t much care for the movie in is entirety.

The Present: Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows Part 2
Rotten Tomatoes: 97% Fresh; 93% Audience

Director: David Yates
Starring: Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, Ralph Fiennes,

Trivia:

  • When David Heyman was asked if there were any actors that he wished had been in the series but never were, he answered Eileen Atkins, Ian McKellen, Daniel Day-Lewis, Daniel Craig, James McAvoy and Anne-Marie Duff. He now wished to work with them in future projects. Daniel Radcliffe would have loved to see Helen Mirren, Judi Dench and Stephen Fry (the narrator of the UK Harry Potter audio-books.)
  • The last of eight movies based on the Harry Potter book series by J.K. Rowling.
  • This film is the only Harry Potter film to be released in 3D in cinemas in their entirety (only select scenes were available for Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix and Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince and only in IMAX).
  • It had been reported that, due to her commitment to Nanny McPhee and the Big Bang, Emma Thompson would be unable to appear in this film. However, she was able to return shortly before the end of filming to once again play Professor Trelawney. She joins her real-life sister Sophie Thompson, as well as her Nanny McPhee cast mates Maggie Smith, Rhys Ifans and Ralph Fiennes.
  • It was reported that a huge blaze wrecked the Hogwarts set after a battle scene went spectacularly wrong. According to the report, explosives used in action sequences set light to scenery for the wizardry school, and that firefighters battled for 40 minutes to bring the flames under control but the set – centerpiece for the film’s Battle of Hogwarts climax – was left badly damaged. It was later confirmed that the fire was greatly exaggerated, and that the set that had been damaged was going to need be rebuilt anyway for use in another scene. Some actors were still filming at the studio but none of the movie’s biggest stars – Daniel Radcliffe (Harry), Emma Watson (Hermione) or Rupert Grint (Ron Weasley) – were involved. No one was injured.
  • Kate Winslet was first considered for and reportedly offered the role of Helena Ravenclaw. The role was rejected by her agent before she was able to consider it, believing that Winslet would not want to “follow suit with every other actor in Britain by being a part of Harry Potter”. The role subsequently went to Kelly Macdonald.
  • John Hurt and Jim Broadbent previously appeared together in Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. George Harris appeared in Raiders of the Lost Ark.
  • In the two parts of this movie, Hermione impersonates both Mafalda Hopkirk; played by Emma Thompson’s sister Sophie Thompson; and Bellatrix Lestrange; played by Helena Bonham Carter, who played Emma’s sister in Howards End.
  • Most of the events in this film – from the raid of Gringotts to the Battle of Hogwarts – take place over the course of a single day.
  • In the story, Voldemort has created several Horcruxes in an attempt to cheat death. Appropriately, his name is French for “Flight of Death” or it can also mean “Stealer/Cheater of death”.
  • Alan Rickman, Bonnie Wright, Devon Murray, Emma Watson, Daniel Radcliffe, Geraldine Somerville, James Phelps, Oliver Phelps, Matthew Lewis, Robbie Coltrane, Rupert Grint, Tom Felton, Josh Herdman and Warwick Davis (as Prof. Flitwick and/or Griphook the Goblin) are the only actors to have appeared in all eight movies.
  • As with the first half of the film, Warwick Davis’s company, Willow Personnel Management, was called upon to provide little people to portray the goblins at Gringotts.
  • When Harry goes into the Room of Requirement in the bottom left hand corner there is the knight that Ron rides from Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.
  • In every shot in which Voldemort and Bellatrix Lestrange appear together, she always moves so that she stands on his right, traditionally the position of the most loyal and trusted follower.

Talking Points:

  • Are we happy its over?
  • Now that it is over, will the actors be able to break out into new things?
  • Lack of exposition..did you like that or not?
  • 3D conversion… any good?
  • Did the Battle of Hogwarts live up to our expectations?
  • David Yates Letter to projectionists

What We Learned:

  • Do not pity the dead, Pity the living.

Trailer:

Recommendations:
Jeff: Amazing ending to the HP saga. Well worth the see. I paid for the 3D and it was well worth it. Not for the 3D, but because I like the movie that much.
Ray: A movie that mostly lived up to my expectations, if I had any complaints is that they should have made each of the last two films a little longer and gotten a little more character development in, I felt a little robbed of some of the more emotional scenes from the book. I thought the 3D was non existent for most of the film.
Steve: I definitely enjoyed it. Took on more of a horror tone and coloring for this film, which got me interested. Definitely not a kids movie. 3D was nice, in my humble opinion.

The Future: Abduction

Director: John Singleton
Starring: Taylor Lautner, Lily Colins, Alfred Molina

Trivia:

  • Principal photography began on July 12, 2010 in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area. Lionsgate returned to the region due to tax benefits from Pennsylvania’s tax credit program, after filming My Bloody Valentine 3D, Warrior, and The Next Three Days there in 2008 and 2009.
  • An open casting call for extras held at Carnegie Mellon University drew over 900 people in June, many of whom were teenage fans of the Twilight film series.
  • Many of the film’s scenes were shot in suburban Mount Lebanon, and some others in Forward Township. Scenes were shot at Hampton High School in Hampton Township, a suburb north of Pittsburgh. The school’s name and mascot, the Talbot, will appear in the film, as well as real students, cheerleaders, and the marching band.

Talking Points:

  • Remind anyone of The Bourne Identity?

Summary:

For as long as he can remember, Nathan Price (Taylor Lautner) has had the uneasiest feeling that he is living someone else’s life. When he stumbles upon an image of himself as a little boy on a missing persons website, all of Nathan’s darkest fears come true: he realizes his parents are not his own and his life is a lie, carefully fabricated to hide something more mysterious and dangerous than he could have ever imagined. Just as he begins to piece together his true identity, Nathan is targeted by a team of trained killers, forcing him on the run with the only person he can trust, his neighbor, Karen (Lily Collins). Every second counts as Nathan and Karen race to evade an army of assassins and federal operatives. But as his opponents close in, Nathan realizes that the only way he will survive and solve the mystery of his elusive biological father is to stop running and take matters into his own hands

Trailer:

Excitement:
Jeff: This trailer SCREAMS horrible movie. It looks fun, action shiney, but unlike Transformers, still tells me not to go see it.
Ray: This smells too much like a Bourne Franchise rip-off with a Twilight star thrown in to draw in that fan base.
Steve: Doesn’t look awful…but does seem like it’s just an opportunity for Lautner to do a solo project away from the Twilight gang. He has the goods to be an action star…now the question is if he can carry it.

Coming Attractions

The Past

The Present

The Future

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MOV061: “Mellow Greetings – What’s Your Boggle?”

In a COL Movies first…Jeff and Ray run the show alone while Steve sends in his thoughts. The boys give their thoughts on the Sylvester Stallone classic, “Demolition Man”…then head to the theater to check out the Tom Hanks and Julia Roberts flick, “Larry Crowne”. They wrap the show up with a review of the trippy trailer for the Americanized, David Fincher version of “The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo”. All this and news about changes to Netflix, how Harry Potter may be linked to a remake of Stephen King’s “The Stand”, as well as new images from Captain America. It’s the 61st reel of COL Movies…Mellow greetings – what seems to be your boggle?

News:

The Past: Demolition Man (1993)
Rotten Tomatoes: 63% Fresh; 60% Audience

Director: Marco Brambilla
Starring: Sylvester Stallone, Wesley Snipes and Sandra Bullock

Trivia:

  • For some non-American releases, references to Taco Bell were changed to Pizza Hut. This includes dubbing, plus changing the logos during post-production. Taco Bell remains in the closing credits. In the Swedish release the subtitles still use Taco Bell while the sound and picture has been altered as above.
  • In the strange attempt to entirely replace the Taco Bell name with Pizza Hut (the name was dubbed over and computer generated images of the logo were pasted over), the editors missed a spot. At the start of the battle outside the restaurant, when everyone is flocking to the window, one pane still holds the logo for Taco Bell and the Taco Bell sign is visible in the first shot of the van (in the background when people are running) on the door.
  • Many of the cars in the movie were prototypes of future models, supplied by General Motors.
  • Sandra Bullock replaced Lori Petty after a few days filming.
  • Sylvester Stallone wanted the Simon Phoenix character to be played by Jackie Chan. Chan refused, since Asian audiences don’t like the idea of actors who have always played heroes suddenly playing evil characters.
  • The “ray gun” used by Wesley Snipes in the Museum Armory sequence is based on the Heckler and Koch G11, a prototype weapon for the German army that would have been the most advanced rifle in the world, firing caseless ammunition (bullets, not death rays).
  • The building used for exterior shots of the SAPD building was the California Headquarters of GTE in Thousand Oaks.
  • The title was taken from The Police’s song of the same name. Hence, the use of Sting to remake the song for the film.
  • In Kuwait the Arabic title of the movie in the cinemas was “Rambo The Destroyer”. The idea is that, seeing the Rambo movies were very popular, associating Sylvester Stallone to Rambo in the title would perhaps sell more tickets.

Talking Points:

  • Would taco bell have won the franchise wars? what FF restaurant would have been featured if this was made today

What We’ve Learned:

  • Don’t trust the thermal scans
  • All restaurants in the future will be Taco Bells
  • Be prepared for the 3 sea shells
  • It takes a maniac to catch a maniac!

Trailer:

Recommendations:
Jeff: Classic action movie. Some might say it’s a bad movie, they may be right but I can’t help myself but like it.
Ray: This was 90’s action film at its peak, When Joel Silver still produced movies that were entertaining.
Steve: I remember that when I first saw this movie, I thought Wesley Snipes was just a major badass – but today he just looks like a cartoon character. I do like the whole evolution of Huxley (Bullock), where she becomes much more confident in her abilities and training. I still haven’t figured out the whole shell thing…LOL! Definitely a good romp in the genre of the other 80s & 90s action movies like The Running Man, Total Recall, and Judge Dredd.

The Present: Larry Crowne (2011)
Rotten Tomatoes: 36% Rotten; 51% Audience

Director: Tom Hanks
Starring: Tom Hanks, Julia Roberts, Gugu Mbatha-Raw and Sarah Mahoney

Trivia:

  • Tom Hanks wrote the film with Nia Vardalos

Talking Points:

  • George Takai – awesome
  • Use of text messages
  • Scooter Gangs

What We Learned:

  • A College Education will help you not only get a better job, but keep your current one.
  • Getting kicked in the butt hurts no matter the language
  • Tai Chi cures Diabetes
  • A deed in Lieu never goes that fast
  • Tucking in your polo shirt makes you look like a cop
  • There are only two things you cant do in college.. smoke in the building, and use YOUR PHONE IN MY CLASS!

Trailer:

Recommendations:
Jeff: The first half of the movie was hard for me to get through. The second half well made up for it. Wonderful date movie.
Ray: they lost me at the kiss… movie is cute, somewhat schitzo
Steve: This felt like my every day at work…lol! It felt a little like Tom Hanks was playing Forrest Gump going to College, but I liked the cast of characters around him. Pam Grier was fun in the movie and George Takei was the perfect Economics professor who thinks he’s funny!!

The Future: The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo

Director: David Fincher
Starring: Daniel Craig, Rooney Mara and Stellan Skarsgård

Trivia:

  • Remake of swedish film based on the novel.

Talking Points:

  • Remake of swedish film, again.

Summary:

Journalist Mikael Blomkvist and rebellious computer hacker Lisbeth Salander team up to investigate the unsolved disappearance of wealthy Henrik Vanger’s teen niece, only to uncover dark secrets about Vanger’s powerful family. Niels Arden Oplev directs this Swedish thriller based on the first novel from Stieg Larsson’s best-selling trilogy.

Trailer:

Excitement:
Jeff: The trailer was thrilling and hooked me with the shiny but didn’t really tell me anything about the movie.  Excited to see it though.
Ray: Excited because its a david fincher movie.. but think I should check out the original first
Steve: Holy crap…my eyes hurt after watching that trailer. Felt like I was watching images from a subliminal movie clip or something. Don’t feel that I really learned anything about the movie, but the music did make it seem like something exciting was going on. Clearly, I need to either read the book or watch the Swedish version before deciding if I’m going to see this.

Coming Attractions

The Past

The Present

The Future

Download Podcast

MOV060: “What’s in the box???”

In this 60th reel of COL Movies, the boys head back in time to revive the thriller “Se7en”, starring Brad Pitt, Morgan Freeman, and perhaps the creepiest performance ever by Kevin Spacey. They head to the theater to check out “Transformers: Dark of The Moon” – if nothing else, just to see if Jeff will orgasm in the theater. Finally, the check out the trailer for the upcoming thriller “Straw Dogs”, starring the dreamy Alexander Saarsgard (otherwise known as Eric from True Blood). They hit up the movie news to talk about new stuff from Paramount, the Man of Steel, Transformer’s record breaking IMAX performance, as well as Ridley Scott’s upcoming “Prometheus”. This is definitely an episode you don’t want to miss..and oh, by the way…What’s in the Box???

News:

  • Paramount Pictures announces Paramount Animation
  • Budgets up to $100 million per film
  • First Release targeted for 2014
  • “Paramount Animation’s mandate will be the development of the broadest range of family CGI animated films, with a key piece being titles under the label of Viacom’s Nickelodeon, the number one entertainment brand for kids worldwide. Paramount will also look to build on Viacom’s already thriving global consumer products business by seeking to capitalize on merchandising opportunities tied to all Paramount Animation releases.
  • Pictures from Man of Steel set released
  • Transformers Dark of the Moon Posts record IMAX opening
  • IMAX Corporation and Paramount Pictures announced today that Transformers: Dark of the Moon 3D, the third film in the blockbuster Transformers franchise, posted a record opening in IMAX(R) theatres, generating $23.1 million globally since launch. The total IMAX domestic take was $14 million, while the 146 domestic theatres that played Transformers: Dark of the Moon exclusively generated $88,500 per screen. The overall box office gross for the movie in the U.S. stands at $180,650,000 million through Monday
  • Lidelof, and Scott release synopsis for Prometheus
  • Visionary filmmaker Ridley Scott returns to the genre he helped define, creating an original science fiction epic set in the most dangerous corners of the universe. The film takes a team of scientists and explorers on a thrilling journey that will test their physical and mental limits and strand them on a distant world, where they will discover the answers to our most profound questions and to life’s ultimate mystery.

The Past: Se7en (1995)

Rotten Tomatoes: 85% Fresh; 94% Audience

Director: David Fincher
Starring: Morgan Freeman, Brad Pitt, Gwyneth Paltrow, Kevin Spacey

Trivia:

  • While filming the scene where Mills chases John Doe in the rain, Brad Pitt fell and his arm went through a car windscreen, requiring surgery. This accident was worked into the script of the film. Ironically, the original script did call for Pitt’s Det. Mills character to be injured during this sequence–but to something other than his hand.
  • The autopsy of the first killing, as originally scripted, was incorrect according to the research of makeup man Rob Bottin (who viewed a real human autopsy as part of his prep work). The scene was truncated from the original script and shows only the sewn-up corpse of Gluttony, not the actual autopsy.
  • Originally, Morgan Freeman drew his pistol with his finger on the trigger. Police officers that were on the set as technical advisors quickly corrected him, as that is not correct police procedure.
  • The original script had a strange, dwarf-like woman as part of the forensics team, appearing in every one of the “cleanups” after a murder and hurling foul language and epithets at Somerset and Mills.
  • An edited-out sequence near the beginning had Somerset looking over the country home he’s planning on moving into. He uses his switchblade to cut loose a rose on a fragment of silk wallpaper and carries it with him throughout the movie. The rose falls out of his jacket as he is taking off his gun before eating with the Mills family. (This touch was edited out, too. Both sequences are in the supplementary section of the Criterion laserdisc.) The rose is briefly visible in the opening scene, sitting atop a handkerchief on Somerset’s dresser.
  • The screenplay had references to a partner Mills had when he still lived in the country, named Parsons. Parsons was shot and killed while on a bust with Mills, and consequently Mills is overprotective of Somerset in some scenes. All references to Parsons were deleted before shooting began.
  • All the building numbers in the opening scene start with 7. The climactic delivery was scheduled for 7pm.
  • New Line executives originally balked at the film’s ending, but Brad Pitt refused to make the film if the ending were changed.
  • Charles S. Dutton has a cameo as the cop who keeps the press out of the Greed crime scene.
  • The producers intended that Kevin Spacey should receive top billing at the start of the movie but he insisted that his name not appear in the opening credits, so as to surprise the audience with the identity of the killer. To compensate, he is listed twice in the closing credits: once before the credits start rolling, and once in the rolling credits in order of appearance. Another advantage from Spacey’s point of view, as he saw it, was that he was excluded from the film’s marketing during its release, meaning he didn’t have to make any public appearances or do any interviews.
  • When Somerset is in his apartment, he can be heard listening to a radio broadcast of John F. McClellan. McLellan was a Boston disc jockey (among other things) who did live Tuesday night broadcasts from the Boston club Storyville, on WHDH radio in the early 1950s. In the clip in the movie, you can hear McLellan’s voice announcing some of the members of the band at Storyville that night, including Charlie Parker with Herb Pomeroy on trumpet.
  • All of John Doe’s books were real books, written for the film. They took two months to complete and cost $15,000. According to Somerset, two months is also the time it would take the police to read all the books.
  • R.E.M’s Michael Stipe was once considered for the role of John Doe.
  • As preparation for his traumatic scene in the interrogation room, Leland Orser would breathe in and out very rapidly so that his body would be overly saturated with oxygen, giving him the ability to hyperventilate. He also did not sleep for a few days to achieve his character’s disoriented look.
  • The film was the subject of a lawsuit brought by a photographer whose work was used in the background of John Doe’s apartment. The case was decided in the filmmakers’ favor. Sandoval v. New Line Cinema Corp., 973 F.Supp. 409, 412-414 (S.D.N.Y 1997).
  • Morgan Freeman’s son, Alfonso Freeman, played the part of a fingerprint technician.
  • Denzel Washington turned down the part that went to Brad Pitt, telling Entertainment Weekly that the film was too “dark and evil.”
  • When looking for the part of Victor, David Fincher stated that he wanted to find someone who was incredibly skinny, around 90 lbs. Michael Reid MacKay auditioned, and at the time weighed 96 lbs. Fincher gave him the part and jokingly told him to lose some more weight. Much to his surprise, MacKay turned up to filming having lost another 6 lbs.
  • The song “6ix” from the Evan Dando album “Car, Button, Cloth” gives away the ending of the film.
  • This was voted the eighth scariest film of all time by Entertainment Weekly.
  • The word “fuck” and its derivatives are said a discernible 74 times throughout the movie, mostly by Brad Pitt.
  • According to earlier versions of the script, the unspoken name of the police captain is Captain Lucas.
  • David Cronenberg was offered a chance to direct this but he turned it down.
  • The box full of photographs at the “Sloth” scene has written on the side “To the World, from Me.”
  • Before Kevin Spacey was set to shoot his first scene, he asked director David Fincher if he should shave his head for the role. David Fincher replied “If you do it, I’ll do it.” Both Fincher and Spacey were bald for the remainder of the movie production.
  • This was regarded as the first “A” production for New Line Cinema, proving that they could attract “A-list” directors and cast.
  • Brad Pitt earned $7 million for this film.
  • Andrew Kevin Walker had enormous difficulty getting a studio to buy the rights to his script because he was a complete unknown in Hollywood. Allegedly he put together a list of agents that represented writers that work in the crime and thriller genres, and just called each one up until he got a positive response.
  • The closing credits for this movie scroll from the top of the screen to the bottom, instead of from the bottom to the top like in most other movies.
  • Gwyneth Paltrow was David Fincher’s first choice for the part of Brad Pitt’s wife, having impressed him with her work in Flesh and Bone (1993). Paltrow was initially not interested so Fincher had to ask her then boyfriend – Brad Pitt – to get her to come in and meet with him.
  • Kevin Spacey was cast two days before filming began.
  • At exactly 7 minutes into the film Mills picks up the phone to be called over to the Gluttony scene.
  • An interesting coincidence is that Se7en portrays religion in a pejorative light, and in private life, Brad Pitt openly admits his disdain for religion of any kind.
  • Andrew Kevin Walker The writer of the film appears as the first corpse.
  • The victim tied to the bed for a year was not an animatronic model, but a very skinny actor made up to look even more corpse-like. Rob Bottin used a set of exaggerated teeth to make the head look smaller and more shrunken from malnutrition.
  • R. Lee Ermey originally auditioned for the part of John Doe. After the part was given to Kevin Spacey, Ermey was offered, and took, the part of the police captain.
  • The prison jumpsuit John Doe wears at the end of the film has the words “Bardach County Jail” written on it. Elinor Bardach was the costume supervisor for this movie.
  • One version of the script contained a few scenes following the final confrontation between the detectives and John Doe. In one, Somerset is recovering in the hospital after being shot by Mills, and the captain delivers a letter to him from Mills which reads, “You were right. You were right about everything.”
  • In one scene, Mills belittles Doe as a “Movie of the Week”. When this film was shown on network television, the line was changed to “Book of the Month”. (The line has since been restored in subsequent showings on Cable television.)
  • Even though he’s probably one of the most horrifying and sadistic killers in cinematic history, John Doe isn’t seen killing anyone on screen.
  • To appease the producers, who wanted to soften the dramatic ending a bit, an alternate version of the ending was storyboarded, with Somerset saying that he “wants out”, and killing John Doe, thereby preventing Doe from winning, and Mills from ending up in jail. In the mean time, the crew shot a test ending, which is basically the theatrical ending without some of the dramatic shots. This finale was so well received in screenings that it convinced the producers to go along with it, and not even film the alternate ending.
  • The ending in the movie is the ending in the original draft of the screenplay. Producer Arnold Kopelson had it rewritten and the ending became a race to save Tracey’s life. When David Fincher, Brad Pitt and Morgan Freeman read the new ending, they all demanded the that original ending be put back in or they wouldn’t do the movie. (From the Platinum Series DVD).
  • One of the re-written endings of the film involved Somerset discovering that John Doe was raised by an abusive priest in a church orphanage. Doe kidnaps Mills and lures Somerset to a decrepit church decorated with artwork depicting the Seven Deadly Sins, intent on making Somerset murder him out of vengeance. Instead, Doe and Somerset engage in a shootout, and Somerset lawfully kills Doe to protect Mills’ life.
  • It is raining every day in the movie except for the last day. The reason is less about thematic issues and more about continuity. It rained on the first day that Brad Pitt filmed so they kept it going as they were rushing to do all of Pitt’s scenes before he left to go make Twelve Monkeys (1995).
  • Kevin Spacey as the antagonist, John Doe, made his first appearance in the film, as the photographer taking pictures of Brad Pitt and Morgan Freeman at the sloth crime scene. If you pause the film at 54:45, when Pitt’s character was slapping the camera out of the photographer’s hand, you can clearly see that, it is Kevin Spacey.
  • John Doe only kills one of the “sinners” himself, and even that one is by accident (kicking Gluttony to wake him up, which makes his stomach burst). All of his other victims either kill themselves (Greed & Pride) or are killed by other people (Lust & Envy) or survive (Sloth & Wrath). The only murder John Doe actually commits intentionally by his own hand is Tracy Mills.
  • The ending narration of Somerset quoting Hemingway was an added compromise that neither David Fincher or Morgan Freeman particularly cared for. The decision came from New Line after poor test screenings regarding the dark ending.

Talking Points:

  • If you saw this movie in the theater, what made you go? Trailer? or word of mouth?
  • The end!

What We’ve Learned:

  • When you want somebody dead, you drive by and shoot them.
  • No matter how emotional you get, you need to keep focused on the details.
  • Just because you have a library card, doesn’t make you yoda
  • Apathy is not a virtue only a solution
  • Love cost’s, takes work and effort.
  • ‘The world is a fine place and worth fighting for.’ I agree with the second part.

Trailer:

Recommendations:
Jeff: Classic thriller, I’m glad I have this in my DVD collection.
Ray: Awesome film, awesome ending.. if you haven’t seen this you should be ashamed of yourself
Steve: Amazing film…I’m glad I took the time to watch it again. Was just as into it as I was the first time.

The Present: Transformers: Dark of the Moon (2011)

Rotten Tomatoes: 37% Rotten; 90% Audience

Director: Michael Bay
Starring: Shia LaBeouf, Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Josh Duhamel, John Turturro, Tyrese Gibson, Buzz Aldrin, Frances McDormand, Peter Cullen, Hugo Weaving, Leonard Nimoy

Trivia:

  • Tony Todd, who voiced the title character of The Fallen in Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen (2009), was going to play a human character in this film, but his role got written out of the script.
  • Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman, who worked on the screenplay for the previous two films, declined to work on this film due to schedules with other films and because they “risked getting stale.”
  • When Megan Fox dropped out shortly before filming began, Gemma Arterton, Ashley Greene, Brooklyn Decker, Miranda Kerr, Bar Refaeli, Amber Heard, Camilla Belle, Katie Cassidy, Heidi Montag and Anna Kendrick were all rumored to replace her before Rosie Huntington-Whiteley was cast.
  • This is director Michael Bay’s first threequel (third instalment in a series/trilogy).
  • The Autobots have upgraded their alternate modes: – Bumblebee has received an upgrade and is now a 2011 Chevrolet Camaro – Ratchet’s color scheme now includes white and his green is more grass-green than his previous neon/yellow green – Sideswipe is now a Chevrolet Centennial Corvette convertible
  • In view of the technology’s rising popularity, Paramount/Dreamworks were adamant to have this film either shot for 3-D or converted in post-production. Director Michael Bay was initially wary of the technology, calling it a “gimmick” in various interviews and noting the poor quality of post-production conversion. Vince Pace, the co-found of PACE 3D who developed 2D and 3D cameras with James Cameron reported in July 2010 that he was working on Transformers 3 and that it will be shot in on PACE 3D cameras. However, for scenes that required higher image quality or were in slow motion, traditional anamorphic 35mm film was used and converted into 3D in post production.
  • Optimus Prime’s trailer bears a resemblance to the original one from “Transformers” (1984) with the decorative stripe running along its side.
  • Rosie Huntington-Whiteley is playing Carly, a primary character that was introduced in the second season of “Transformers” (1984).
  • During filming in Washington, DC, the 2011 Chevrolet Camaro that plays Bumblebee was struck by an metro police K-9 SUV responding to a bomb alert. The police officer involved sustained minor injuries, and Bumblebee sustained considerable damage. Filming was able to continue, as there were copies of each automobile for shooting purposes.
  • A tilting office set was constructed to simulate a Decepticon attack.
  • The Wreckers take the alternate modes of NASCAR Chevrolet Impala automobiles, resembling those of Juan Pablo Montoya (#42 Target), Dale Earnhardt, Jr. (#88 AMP Energy/National Guard) and Jimmie Johnson (#48 Lowe’s/Kobalt)
  • The “dark of the moon” is defined as a phase (approximately three days) when the light of the moon is obscured, and thus absent (i.e. a no-moon time), and precedes the new moon and the beginning of a new lunar cycle. Symbolically, it represents a time of inner stillness and contemplation, and preparedness for a new beginning.
  • The Autobot Wheeljack’s alternate mode in “Transformers” (1984) was a Lancia Stratos sportscar, but this was revised to a Mercedes-Benz E550 automobile. His head is also luminescent, in homage to his appearance in the series where two bulb-like appendages on his face regularly lit up.
  • The idea of Apollo 11 being connected to the discovery of the Transformers had been previously put forth in the Transformers (2007) tie-in prequel novel ‘Ghosts of Yesterday’.
  • Production stalled in Chicago as Gabriella Cedillo, an extra was seriously injured driving her own car as background for a stunt shot. The stunt was taking place in the opposite lane and a metal object – rigging from a snapped cable – went flying through her windshield and struck her in the skull. Cedillo suffered permanent brain damage, included left side paralysis and limited vision in her left eye. Paramount Studios provided an undisclosed amount of money to cover the cost of her medical care.
  • US$1 million was spent during the two days of filming at the Milwaukee Art Museum.
  • Corey Burton, who voiced Shockwave in “Transformers” (1984) and “Transformers: Animated” (2007), was approached to reprise Shockwave for the film, but turned it down as he’d done that role too many times. He had earlier been approached to voice Jazz and Brawl for the first film.
  • Megatron’s alternate mode in this film is a Mack Titan tanker truck, his first Earth disguise. This was chosen to put him on parallel with Optimus Prime (the filmmakers described him as “a demented version of Prime”). This mode also pays homage to the “Transformers: Robots in Disguise” (2001) Decepticon Scourge (also known in Japan as “Black Convoy”), who is an evil clone of Optimus Prime.
  • Michael Bay described the tone of the film as “a homeland version of Black Hawk Down (2001) with giant alien robots.”
  • Sentinel Prime is primarily based on his role in the “Transformers” comics (Optimus Prime’s yellow-colored predecessor) and his lance and shield were taken from his “Transformers: Animated” (2007) incarnation, but his later form on Earth – a red Rosenbauer Panther fire truck – is a homage to “Transformers: Robots in Disguise” (2001)’s Optimus Prime, whose alternate mode was a fire truck.
  • Laserbeak’s alternate mode in “Transformers” (1984) was a tape cassette, but that was considered old-fashioned. He retains his robotic condor form throughout the film.
  • This is the first movie that starts with Megatron being conscious. In previous installments Megatron was awakened or resurrected.
  • The Autobot Steeljaw was originally a robotic lion and a minion of Blaster in “Transformers” (1984), but this was revised to a robotic hound and minion of Leadfoot.
  • To film the skydiving sequence, Michael Bay attached cameras to the divers’ helmets to capture their descent into Chicago.
  • The Autobot Mirage was originally a Formula-1 race car but this was altered to a Ferrari 458 italia
  • Scenes from Michael Bay’s The Island (2005) freeway way chase were recycled for the chase on the freeway between The Autobots and the Decepticon Dreads.
  • This is not Leonard Nimoy’s first appearance in a Transformers movie. He provided the voice of Galvatron (the upgraded Megatron) in the 1985 animated Transformers movie, which also had Peter Cullen as Optimus Prime; the two had no lines together in that movie, however, as Optimus was killed before Galvatron was created.
  • There are several homages to storylines from the original Transformers (1984) cartoon. Megatron removing Abraham Lincoln from the Lincoln Memorial and using the chair as a throne, the Decepticons creating a Space Bridge to pull Cybertron into orbit around Earth, as well as the Autobots being exiled and forced to leave Earth to the mercy of the Decepticons all happened in the cartoon series.
  • The character, Sentinel Prime, as voiced by Leonard Nimoy, uttered a familiar and famous phrase in the later half of the film … “The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few,” which is a direct quote from his most memorable character, Spock, from the film ‘Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan”
  • Megatron’s characterization in this film heavily reflects that of Galvatron, Megatron’s upgraded form, from the original series (“Transformers” (1984)). This being, after the destruction of Galvatron’s Master, Unicron, he becomes a little more than insane in the series, in the same way, the destruction of The Fallen from the previous film (Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen (2009)) has caused Megatron to go slightly insane.
  • The Gulfstream III private jet in which Sam and Mearing travel to Florida is owned by Michael Bay. Its tail number – 4500X – is the same as the helicopter Blackout used as a disguise in the first movie.
  • Early in the film a scene from the original Star Trek is shown along with the comment that “this is the episode where Spock goes insane”. This foreshadows Sentinal Prime’s insane plan later in the film as Leonard Nimoy played both Spock in Star Trek and the voice of Sentinal Prime.
  • A Decepticon attack leaves Simmons in a wheelchair. This is a homage to Chip Chase, a wheelchair-bound human from “Transformers” (1984) who was an ally of the Autobots.
  • Michael Bay compared Megatron to Colonel Kurtz in Apocalypse Now (1979): “He’s hiding in the jungles of Africa, nursing his wounds and vainly hiding his pulverized visage while plotting – what else? – revenge!”
  • Peter Cullen’s favorite moment in the film is when Optimus Prime meets with astronaut Buzz Aldrin.
  • Michael Bay conceived the Driller’s destruction of the skyscraper while doing stomach-crunch exercises.
  • When the employee is pushing the buttons on the photo copier that later transforms into Laserbeak, the distinct tones of the copier form the title theme song of the animated Transformers TV series.
  • The _Star Trek (TV Series 1966-1969)_ episode watched by Brains and Wheelie, where Spock “turns evil”, foreshadows the later betrayal by Sentinel Prime, who was voiced by Leonard Nimoy.

Talking Points:

  • How was the 3D
  • Anyone catch the nod to Star Trek 2?
  • Rosie’s performance
  • Shockwave – worth the wait?
  • The two annoying bots…again.

What We Learned:

  • Mark Ryan is hot. Oh wait, that’s a reference to the previous two movies.
  • Michael Bay lied about not having annoying bots in this movie.
  • See, 3D can be good if you try.
  • Peter Cullen’s Voice is orgasmic.
  • The Warriors path is a solitary one
  • Russian is like all the buttons on a calculator you never push
  • The Needs of the many, outweigh the needs of the few……or the one

Trailer:

Recommendations:
Jeff: Eye and ear candy extravaganza! See it in 3D! Although 2D would be fine if you can’t see 3D anyway
Ray: This movie might be good if there were no people in it. I enjoyed watching Chicago burn.
Steve: I enjoyed it. The actors weren’t exactly great…but the action was! See it in 3D!

The Future: Straw Dogs

Director: Rod Lurie
Starring: James Marsden, Kate Bosworth, Alexander Skarsgård

Trivia:

  • It is a remake of Sam Peckinpah’s 1971 film of the same name, in turn based on the Gordon Williams novel The Siege of Trencher’s Farm.

Talking Points:

  • Anyone see the original? 1971 Dustin Hoffman
  • Falling down? History of Violence?

Summary:

L.A. screenwriter David Sumner relocates with his wife to her hometown in the deep South. There, while tensions build between them, a brewing conflict with locals becomes a threat to them both.

Trailer:

Excitement:
Jeff: Meh, looks alright. Could be interest . . .zzzzzzzzz
Ray: I never saw the Original..although I may see it now… not sure why this film had to be remade
Steve: I think this looks like it’s going to be a good one! Seems a little like “The Strangers”, but with more to it. I think I’m going to like it!

Coming Attractions

The Past

The Present

The Future

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MOV059: “Let’s Do The Time Warp Again!”

This week the boys round out pride month by getting stranded in front of Dr. Frank-N-furters castle and explore the crazy twists and turns of the 1975 cult hit musical Rocky Horror Picture Show.Does the show go on? or should this science fiction double feature get zapped by the antimatter beam? Next we put the pedal to the metal and talk about Pixar’s Cars 2, does this somewhat unexpected sequel it make it to the winners circle? or crash and burn before making it to the finish line? Lastly we take a look at the trailer for Immortals a November film brought to us by the producers responsible for 300, is this an epic blockbuster in the making or just another thanksgiving turkey? All this, movie news and more! so get that Transit Beam ready and join us for the next reel of COL Movies!

News:

  • All-You-Can-Watch MoviePass Brings Netflix Model to Theaters – http://www.wired.com/epicenter/2011/06/all-you-can-watch-moviepass-brings-netflix-model-to-theaters/?currentPage=all
  • $50 a month for all the movies you can watch
  • In Beta and currently only rolling out in San Francisco Bay Area right now
  • These San Francisco Bay Area Theaters will participate in the MoviePass beta, which launches Wednesday: The Clay, Bridge, Lumiere, Embarcadero, Opera Plaza Cinemas and AMC Van Ness 14 in San Francisco; AMC Bay Street 16 in Emeryville; California Theatres and Shattuck Cinemas in Berkeley; Piedmont Theatre in Oakland; Albany Twin in Albany; Big Cinemas Towne 3, Camera 3, Camera 12, AMC Eastridge 15 and AMC Saratoga 14 in San Jose; Camera 7 in Campbell; AMC Mercado 20 in Santa Clara; AMC Cupertino Square 16 in Cupertino; Camera Cinemas Los Gatos in Los Gatos; and Aquarius in Palo Alto.
  • Another movie based on a ride from Disneyland is in the works http://www.firstshowing.net/2011/disney-developing-matterhorn-inspired-adventure-movie-the-hill/
  • Lindhoff spills the beans on the upcoming Ridley Scott film ‘Prometheus’ http://www.firstshowing.net/2011/damon-lindelof-reveals-prometheus-alien-universe-connection/
  • Tom Hanks Says Another ‘Toy Story’ Apparently Already in the Works
  • http://www.firstshowing.net/2011/tom-hanks-says-another-toy-story-apparently-already-in-the-works/
  • Jeff completes the Gay Pride Month Movie Challenge 10 minutes before the show. Check out the discussion on the most Recent Episode of Cubs Out Loud.

Feedback:

Hi Guys,

I heard about your show on The Morning Stream and just wanted to say
that I really enjoy it. Not sure how many subscribers you have out
there but you now have one more. Keep up the good work.

Best,
Ryan the german chaser

ON iTunes – 5 star rating from SpeedRcr on June 26 – The guys are nice and the show is fun.

The Past: The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975)
Rotten Tomatoes: 76% Fresh; 85% Audience

Director: Jim Sharman
Starring: Tim Curry, Susan Sarandon, Barry Bostwick, Richard O’Brien, Patricia Quinn, Nell Campbell, Jonathan Adams, Peter Hinwood, Meat Loaf

Trivia:

  • Mick Jagger wanted to play Dr. Frank N. Furter in the film version
  • Aside from the chemical symbols scrawled on the lab wall next to the control panel, there is a grocery list calling for flour, eggs, bread, sugar and two hypodermics.
  • Steve Martin auditioned for the role of Brad
  • Most of the actors weren’t told of the prop corpse of Eddie under the dining room tablecloth. When it was revealed during filming, their looks of horror are geniune.
  • the Museum Lichtspiele cinema in Muenchen, Germany has been screened the movie every week since 24 June 1977, offering special “RHPS-Kits” to enable celebrations during the show. They contain: a biscuit (for the toast), rice, a whistle, a candle (for “There’s a light”) and a sheet of paper with instructions for the time warp.
  • At the midnight showings, not only do patrons dress up, they bring props. There are no hard-and-fast rules on props, but the following is a list of some of the most common:
  • Rice (to be thrown at Ralph and Betty’s wedding)
  • Water pistols (back row squirts them during rain scene)
  • Newspapers (for front and middle rows to shield themselves from rain)
  • Flashlights or cigarette lighters (“There’s a Light” verse of “Over at Frankenstein Place”)
  • Rubber gloves (during and after the creation speech, Frank snaps his gloves three times)
  • Noisemakers (the Transylvanians applaud Frank’s creation – so should you)
  • Toilet paper preferably “Scott’s” brand (when Brad yells “Great scott!”, throw a roll)
  • Confetti (at the end of the “Charles Atlas” reprise, the Transylvanians throw confetti)
  • Toast (when Frank proposes a toast at dinner)
  • Party hat (when Frank puts on his hat to wish Rocky happy birthday, so does the audience)
  • Bell (“When we made it/did you hear a bell ring?”)
  • Cards (“Cards for sorrow/cards for pain”)
  • The props tend to vary somewhat from city to city, especially as some localities (and theaters) impose restrictions. For example, the “There’s a light” prop was almost always lighters during the original 1970s shows, but open flames are now banned in most movie theaters (either by theater policy or by law – and considering that another common prop is newspapers, this is generally a good idea). Another example is that some fans insist that the toast should be buttered. However, many theaters frown on this, due to the mess (and the possibility of someone slipping).
  • One night, during a typical midnight screening at a New York theater, a patron was asked to leave before the film ended. This patron was accused of being an impostor. The patron was Tim Curry.

Talking Points:

  • Has anyone been to an actual midnight showing of this?
  • What do you guys think the cult appeal is for this movie?
  • video release – impact on popularity?

What We’ve Learned:

  • Always keep that AAA card handy
  • Dominant and Forceful = the perfect specimen of manhood
  • Wheelchairs can climb stairs as long as magnets are involved.
  • Don’t get hot and flustered, use a bit of mustard.
  • Ask for nothing and you shall receive it in abundance

Trailer:

Recommendations:
Jeff: Everyone should see this once especially with a group at home. Check out the DVD with the prompts.
Ray: Everyone should see this movie at least once.
Steve: Brings back so many memories…but honestly, I miss this in the theater. DVD at home is just not the same.

The Present: Cars 2 (2011)
Rotten Tomatoes: 34% Rotten; 64% Audience

Director: John Lasseter, Brad Lewis
Starring: Owen Wilson, Larry the Cable Guy, Michael Caine, Emily Mortimer, Eddie Izzard, John Turturro, Bonnie Hunt

Trivia:

  • Finn McMissile is a stylized Aston Martin DB5, James Bond’s trademark vehicle. (According to ‘James Bond Vehicles’ by John Cork and Collin Stutz, it never carried missiles, though. The Goldfinger version had machine guns where McMissile has his missiles.)
  • Out of respect for Paul Newman, who died in 2008, Doc Hudson is not included in this film.
  • The first John Lasseter-directed Pixar film not to have a score by Randy Newman.
  • The name Miles Axlerod, as voiced by Eddie Izzard, was taken from one of Izzard’s stand-up routines about the invention of the wheel and axle.
  • John Lasseter conceived the story for the sequel while he was in Europe promoting the first “Cars”.
  • Finn McMissile was actually conceived for an unused scene in the first “Cars” where Lightning McQueen and Sally were seeing a spy movie featuring McMissile while on a date. McMissile was saved for this sequel.

Talking Points:

  • What did you think of the opener “Hawaiian Vacation”
  • was this made Simply to make money? Merch? (only pixar film to get such low scores on RT)
  • Environmental message a little heavy handed?
  • Violence? Friends with kids had bad reactions…
  • Is the Radiator Springs movie theater showing “The Incredibles” a clue to anything?
  • State Farm commercial
  • Steve request about summer movies that kids might like
  • Random – did y’all have Puss In Boots trailer ahead of this? WTF?

What We Learned:

  • He who finds a friend finds a treasure
  • A wise car hears one word and understands two…
  • To crush their dreams, you must first raise them high

Trailer:

Recommendations:
Jeff: Very cute movie. I recommend seeing it, but unless you’re excited to see it. Wait for DVD.
Ray: The movie my inner 8 year old has been waiting for… its like lasseter read my brain. I actually enjoyed this one much more than the first.
Steve: Thought it was alright. I liked that Mater was more in this one. Also liked the spy stuff…who doesn’t? 🙂

The Future: Immortals

Director: Tarsem Singh
Starring: Henry Cavill, Mickey Rourke, John Hurt

Trivia:

  • The film was previously named Dawn of War and War of the Gods before being officially named Immortals and is loosely based on the Greek myth of Theseus and the Minotaur and the Titanomachy.

Talking Points:

  • Is the 300 “look” being used to ride off the coat tails of that movies success?

Summary:

In Tarsem Singh’s upcoming film Immortals, Hyperion(Mickey Rourke) is a king who declares war on humanity and leads a bloodthirsty army on a murderous rampage across Greece in search of the Epirus Bow in order to free the Titans and annihilate the Gods and mankind. It is left to a peasant named Theseus (Henry Cavill), chosen by Zeus (Luke Evans) and accompanied by the priestess Phaedra (Freida Pinto) and a slave (Stephen Dorff), to protect his homeland and save the gods.

Trailer:

Excitement:
Jeff: These type of movies always make me want to go see them. I think Gladiator started that for me. I’ve been burned by Clash of the Titan, I’m just hoping for at least a fun ride if not a good movie.
Ray: Looks pretty, I hope the story holds up to the visuals
Steve: Seems just like a hybrid of Clash of the Titans and 300. Trailer draws me in, but I’m sceptical.

Coming Attractions

The Past

The Present

The Future

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