MOV114: “Looks like two pigs fightin’ under a blanket.”

The boys head back in time to review one of the “cultural classics” with “Steel Magnolias”. After putting down the tissue box, it was off to the theater for Oliver Stone’s crime drama “Savages”. In trailer-land, they check out the upcoming college acapella-based comedy “Pitch Perfect”. All of this, an update on the Bourne franchise and will the World of Warcraft film get off the ground? It’s the 114th reel of COL Movies – “Looks like two pigs fighting under a blanket”

News:

The Past: Steel Magnolias

Rotten Tomatoes: 68% Fresh; 88% Audience

Director: Herbert Ross

Staring: Sally Field, Dolly Parton, Olympia Dukakis, Shirley MacLaine, Darryl Hannah, Julia Roberts

Trivia:

  • This movie was based on a play written about a sister of Phi Mu Fraternity. Susan Harling was a member of the Kappa Iota chapter and her brother wrote the play on which the movie is based.
  • Winona Ryder was originally offered the role of Shelby.
  • When Robert Harling last spoke to his sister, he was telling her how hard it was to be a writer in New York and have people consider his work. His sister commented on how she wished she could help him somehow but she didn’t know what she could do. When she died after surgery, Harling wrote the play that this movie is based on in her honor, thereby making him an established and respected writer.
  • Daryl Hannah was originally turned down for the role of Annelle as the director thought that she was too attractive to play the part, she asked if she could come in and read for the part anyway. She arrived at the studio the next day dressed as Annelle and was so unrecognisable that security refused to let her in.
  • Meg Ryan was initially under contract to play Shelby, the Julia Roberts role, but the producers let her out of it to play Sally in When Harry Met Sally…
  • Is shot in the small Louisiana town of Natchitoches. Reportedly, the filmmakers placed such a great strain on the locals, particularly those who volunteered to be extras, that several years later, when the film The Man in the Moon was shot in the same town, extras were difficult to find, as so many townspeople had been burned by the Steel Magnolias crew.
  • M’Lynn’s home is actually two different houses. The Cook-Taylor House, owned by the Henry Taylor family and now a Bed and Breakfast in Natchitoches, was used for the outside front of the house, and most of the scenes inside the home and in the back yard. It is on Front Street by the river and can be easily located, as it is now known as “The Steel Magnolias Bed and Breakfast.” During filming, the Taylors moved out and rented an apartment.
  • There is no parish or town in Louisiana known as Chinquapin. “Chinquapin” is the name for a type of fish and a particular breed of oak tree. The town of Natchitoches in the parish of the same name served as the backdrop for the film. The town was named after the “NAKTOSH” Indians whose names means “chinquapin eaters”. Natchitoches actually does have a large Christmas Light Festival annually. Natchitoches was also the first settlement in the Louisiana Territory.
  • After a poor take, director Herbert Ross reprimanded Dolly Parton and asked her if she could act. She replied “No, but it’s your job to make me look like I can!”
  • On the DVD’s commentary track, Herbert Ross describes how Georges Delerue was not his first choice as a composer for this film. Another “well known” composer’s music was rejected but he fails to say who.
  • There was some initial resistance to casting Sally Field as M’Lynn, because the producers thought no one would believe her as the mother of a 22-year-old until she pointed out that, in real life, she had a 22-year-old son.
  • Dolly Parton and Daryl Hannah studied hair stylists so their scenes where they are doing hair would be real and authentic.
  • When Bette Davis saw the off-Broadway play, she thought it would be a great film for her, envisioning herself as Ouiser, Katharine Hepburn as Clairee, and Elizabeth Taylor as Truvy. However, when she contacted the rights holders for the movie adaptation, she found out that they intended to cast much younger actresses.
  • Opened on Broadway on Monday, April 4th, 2005 at the Lyceum Theater and ran for 136 performances.
  • Ouiser mentions that she and her friends used to dress up like nuns and go barhopping when they were young. Shirley MacLaine played a woman who dressed up as a whiskey-drinking nun in Two Mules for Sister Sara.
  • The title has been said to suggest that the main characters are delicate as magnolias but tough as steel, but this is not explained in the movie. The only references to the two words are Ouiser’s near accusation of Drum of stealing Magnolias from her tree, and then a later comment by M’Lynn that men are supposed to be made out of steel.
  • Between the six female principals are twelve Academy Award nominations and five wins. Only Daryl Hannah and Dolly Parton have not won, although Parton was nominated for Best Song from “Nine to Five” and “Transamerica.”
  • Writer Robert Harling has said that the film follows the last three years of his sister’s life.
  • In the original source play, there are no on-stage roles for men. Although the characters all spend a great deal of time talking about the men in their lives, no male character ever actually appears during the play.
  • Herbert Ross wanted an authentic feel to the hospital scenes, so he hired the doctors and nurses who tended to the writer’s sister (on whom the movie and play are based) during her last days in hospital to play themselves during Julia Roberts’ scenes on life support.
  • Robert Harling, the man who wrote the play ‘Steel Magnolias’ in honor of his sister, plays the pastor who performs Shelby’s wedding and then again her funeral.
  • Robert Harling’s mother was on set during the filming of the scenes while Shelby was in the hospital. During the scene when Shelby is taken off life support she was asked if she wanted to leave. She declined, saying that once the scene was over she wanted to see Shelby – Julia Roberts – get up and walk away.

Talking Points:

  • That was the most severe case of Diabetes I have EVER SEEN.
  • The ensemble
  • Which Steel Magnolia are you?

Critic Notes

  • Positives: ensemble performance was excellent; superficial yet endearing; it may have flaws, but I laugh and cry every time I see it (so sue me)
  • Negatives: cliche’ plot; main cast sounded like they were reading bumper sticker one liners the entire movie

What We Learned:

  • There is no such thing as natural beauty
  • If you can achieve puberty you can have a past
  • An ounce of pretension worth a pound of manure
  • Personal Tragedy should not interfere with your ability to do good hair.
  • Iced tea is the house wine of the south
  • 30 Minutes of wonderful is better than a lifetime of nothing special
  • The only thing that separates us from the animals is our ability to accessorise
  • All gay men have track lighting and are named Rick, Mark or STEVE.

Trailer:

Recommendations:
Rick: This is one of those fun Chick flicky movie but for some reason I wouldn’t really call it a chick flick. Definitely a gay card stampable film. It’s a nice movie, see it at least once for your gay card and maybe again every couple of years or so.
Mark: Cute, sad, loved Sally Fields performance… It did seem a little extreme with the tone, but overall a decent watch.
Steve: I can never pass up this movie if it’s on tv. Maybe it’s a Southern thing, but I feel like it’s a big slice of culture that really exists and shows how the veil of perfection is maintained by prototypical Southern women – and how the truth is that they run the world while allowing their husband to think he does! You can’t help but laugh at the plethora one one liners and amazing performances. Can’t miss – can watch it with your girlfriends, your “gurl-friends”, your mom, or your grandmother.

The Present: Savages

Rotten Tomatoes: 54% Rotten; 61% Audience

Director: Oliver Stone

Starring: Taylor Kitsch, Blake Lively, Aaron Johnson, Salma Hayek, Benecio Del Toro, John Travolta

Trivia:

  • Leonardo DiCaprio, Tom Hardy, Garrett Hedlund and James Franco were considered to play Ben.
  • Jennifer Lawrence was originally cast as O, but pulled out in order to star in The Hunger Games. Before Blake Lively was cast, Olivia Wilde, Abbie Cornish, Amber Heard and Teresa Palmer were considered, and Lindsay Lohan expressed interest.
  • Oliver Stone began working on the screenplay adaptation before the book was published. So confidant he was of this story that he himself contributed to investing in the project.
  • Although this is the sixth time that Fernando Lara and Oliver Stone have worked together, it will be Lara’s first credited appearance in one of Stone’s films.
  • Not only did Demián Bichir and Benicio Del Toro co-star in Steven Soderbergh’s movies on Che Guevara, but Oliver Stone had previously filmed several interviews with Fidel Castro, whom Bichir played in the Che Guevara films. Gonzalo Menendez also played Castro in The Lost City
  • Taylor Kitsch received training from real Navy SEALs as a part of his preparation for the film.
  • Third time that Gary Stretch has acted under director Oliver Stone.
  • Originally scheduled for a Fall release, the opening date was immediately moved to July following the first screening for the studio.
  • Oliver Stone cast Taylor Kitsch after watching his performance in footage from Battleship, which was still in post-production at the time.
  • Oliver Stone instructed Blake Lively to take firearm training for her role. Despite not being experienced at the gun range, she hit center mass in her first three shots.
  • Oliver Stone wrote a new role for Trevor Donovan after the part he had originally auditioned for was cut out.
  • Taylor Kitsch performed his own stunts.
  • For legal reasons, all the marijuana plants in the film are artificial. The production designers visited legal medical marijuana growers to get the details right.
  • This is Oliver Stone’s first film in nearly 17 years to be photographed with Panavision anamorphic lenses. After Nixon in 1995, his 2.35:1 films were cropped to that ratio via shooting in Super 35. He was convinced to return to anamorphic by cinematographer Daniel Mindel, who has shot all of his features except Domino in the format. Mindel told Stone during their first meeting that if the plan was to shoot in Super 35 or digitally, then he wasn’t the right man for the job.
  • Uma Thurman was cast as Paqu, O’s mother but her scenes were cut from the movie.
  • Jake McLaughlin who plays Doc, is a real life Iraq war veteran.
  • Shipped to theaters under the code name “Paqu”.
  • The funny jingle and ringtone that La Reina uses is the theme song of one of the most famous and popular shows in the history of Mexican TV: El chavo del ocho.

Talking Points:

  • Individual Performances

Critic Notes

  • Positives: The movie may be aggravating and falters, but Stone made a solid film; Salma Hayek; the mood flips on a dime dependent on the situations in the film – not many people other than Stone could pull that off; Shows a ruthless energy; Stone showed his fearless side making this film
  • Negatives: The main characters are not good people and not worth caring about; botched ending; exceptionally flashy mayhem; juvenile fantasy; muddled storyline; utterly boring; predictable and strained

What We Learned:

  • Drugs are a rational response to insanity

Trailer:

Recommendations :
Jeff: You know, I thought this movie was going to have a lot more fighty fighty and blood and guts. It didn’t give me what I was expecting and while most of the acting was good, some was over the top and cheesy. There was something able Selma Hayek’s performance which felt phoned in. Travolta did a great job I though. Overall, it was decent, okay to see in the theaters but also okay to wait until rental.
Ray: Brutal, brutal movie. An interesting take on the onscreen love affair between 3 people. If you like a good crime drama with an interesting symmetry between the major players this is definitely worth a watch.
Steve: Salma Hayek was so awesome in this film and a total highlight. Otherwise, the first 30 minutes was totally uncomfortable for me and I literally didn’t want to stay for the rest. But once it got into the stuff between them and La Rena, it started to get interesting. Overall though, just not my kind of movie.

The Future: Pitch Perfect

Release: October 5, 2012

Director: Jason Moore

Starring: Brittany Snow, Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson

Summary:

Beca, a freshman at Barton University, is cajoled into joining The Bellas, her school’s all-girls singing group. Injecting some much needed energy into their repertoire, The Bellas take on their male rivals in a campus competition.

Talking Points:

  • The obvious Glee comparison
  • The world of competitive college acapella
  • Could be too niche to be successful
  • On The Rocks


Trailer:

Excitement:
Jeff: I’m actually excited to see this movie. Mainly for the songs. The rest of the movie is going to be complete and utter crap but the songs are going to be what makes this movie worth it. I almost hope there is next to no story and the scenes between the songs are just 1-2 minutes on only there to transition between songs.
Ray: Glee meets Step up + Bridesmaids? Trailer looks decent, but this would be a rental for me.. and no not because Id be ashamed to see it in the theater.. I own that I’m a choir geek.
Steve: As a former acapella group guy, I’m interested if for no other reason to see what they represent about the wacky world of college acapella. Otherwise, it’s all about supporting my fellow alum Brittany Snow (Go Gaither!) and to see what Rebel Wilson does!

The Past:

The Present:

The Future:

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MOV058: “I Pledge Allegiance To A Lantern”

The boys continue the Pride Month moviefest with the Spanish film, “Bear Cub”. Does the bear culture translate outside of the US? *wink, wink* Get it? (it’s subtitled!) They head to the theater to check out Ryan Reynolds and his transluscent costume in “Green Lantern”. Did the studio get it right? The movie…that is 🙂 Lastly, they head to the future to find out if “Anonymous” should be identified as a movie they’d want to see. All this, movie news about Jamie Foxx, Pirates hitting the all-time top 10, a new Pixar project, and Hollywood says goodbye to a Jackass. Wait for your mind to be blown!

News:

  • Jamie Foxx cast in quentien Tarantino’s Django Unchained
  • The writer/director’s revenge-driven “Southern” would feature Foxx as Django, a freed American slave who teams with a German bounty hunter (Christoph Waltz) to save his wife from Calvin Candie, an evil plantation owner (to be played by Leonardo DiCaprio).
  • Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides Enters All-Time Top 10
  • Just entered the top 10 of all-time worldwide box office hits with $956.7 million earned worldwide. The film has passed up Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1’s $954.5 million and should shortly surpass Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End’s $963.4 million to move up to No. 9.
  • “On Stranger Tides” has reached this point with 76.8% of ticket sales coming from international territories. Domestically, the Rob Marshall-directed adventure has reached $221.5 million, but overseas the film has collected an impressive $735.2 million.
  • New Pixar Project gets release date set
  • Nov 27, 2013 for the yet unnamed project
  • Cars 2 is the next film releasing this friday, followed by “Brave” releasing June 22, 2012 and Monsters University (Monsters Inc 2) June 21’st 2013
  • RIP Ryan Dunn
  • Him and passenger died in a fiery car crash in the early morning hours of June 20’th
  • He had just turned 34 on June 11th

 

The Past: Bear Cub (Cachorro) (2004)
Rotten Tomatoes: 77% Fresh; 77% Audience

Director: Miguel Albaladejo
Starring: José Luis García Pérez, David Castillo and Empar Ferrer

Trivia:

  • The Spanish title “Cachorro” literally translates as “puppy”, “pup” or “cub”.
  • Jose Luis Garcia Perez gained over 26 pounds for his role, mainly by eating cheesecake.
  • The scenes shot at the fairground were actually filmed by Jose Luis Garcia Perez.
  • This is an extension of a short film that Miguel Albaledejo made in 1996.
  • Bernardo’s emotional final scene with his grandmother was caught in the first take. Director Miguel Albaledejo asked his young actor David Castillo to do a second take because a fly was buzzing around in the background but Castillo refused as he was so emotionally drained by the scene. The fly was removed digitally.

Talking Points:

  • Is this more about the cub or the bear?
  • Which is better – Bear Cub or BearCity? (Jeff: Is this a trick question?)

What We’ve Learned:

  • When cruising out in public.. best to keep an eye out for PI’s with camera’s
  • Holy cow spanish people talk FAST!
  • There are a bunch of hot bears in Madrid

Trailer:

Recommendations:
Jeff: This is a Bear movie that should be in every Bear’s DVD collection. If you haven’t seen it before, you really should.
Ray: Finally a “Bear” movie I would not be ashamed to show my friends… at least the “Edited” version.
Steve: Definitely an interesting movie! Don’t know that it’s my favorite, but it’s a cuddly coming of age story.

Intermission:

The Present: Green Lantern (2011)
Rotten Tomatoes: 26% Rotten; 60% Audience

Director: Martin Campbell
Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Blake Lively and Peter Sarsgaard

Trivia:

  • Greg Berlanti signed on to co-write and direct the film in 2007, but he stepped down to instead direct This Is Where I Leave You (????) and handed direction over to Martin Campbell. However, he remained on board as a writer and producer.
  • In the comics, there have been six people who held (and still hold) the title of the Green Lantern: Alan Scott (1940), Hal Jordan (1959), Guy Gardner (1968), John Stewart (1971), Kyle Rayner (1994) and Jennifer-Lynn Hayden i(AKA “Jade,” Alan Scott’s daughter, 1983). Scott and Jade are the only ones who are different because their powers come from a magical source, and though they have been Green Lanterns in name, they are actually not part of the Green Lantern Corps, though Jade did serve in it briefly at one point.
  • Sam Worthington and Chris Pine were in consideration for the role of Hal Jordan. Bradley Cooper, Justin Timberlake and Jared Leto also screen-tested for the role before finally, Ryan Reynolds was cast as Jordan.
  • Brian Austin Green, a fan of the Green Lantern, campaigned actively to get the role of Hal Jordan.
  • The movie was originally scheduled to be shot at Fox Studios in Sydney, Australia but the rising Australian dollar forced the studio and director Martin Campbell to seek relocation, New Orleans and various parishes around the city was chosen because it was it was perfect location from the scouts, the city has perfect aura for filming almost anything, many studio’s are being built in the city now known as Hollywood south and Louisiana tax incentive that many other cities have copied but still not as successful as Louisiana have help make it easy to film big and small budget movies in the State.
  • Keri Russell, Eva Green, Jennifer Garner and Diane Kruger were all considered to play Carol Ferris.
  • Comic book writer Geoff Johns, who has worked on the “Green Lantern” comic and made it a resounding success, was signed on as a creative consultant on the film.
  • At one point Clark Kent/Superman was in the script (he had a cameo as one of the candidates considered to receive a power ring), but he was cut out because the filmmakers didn’t want to depend on another superhero for a success.
  • The scriptwriters drew inspiration from the Green Lantern comics ‘Emerald Dawn’ (which told the story of Hal Jordan’s induction into the Green Lantern Corps and how he became its greatest member) and ‘Secret Origin’ (a modern retelling of Hal Jordan’s early days as a Green Lantern), as well as the work of Denny O’NeilNeal Adams and Dave Gibbons‘ work on the “Green Lantern” comic.
  • Around June 2006, Robert Smigel had completed a script of the film, which was a comedy-adventure and was to star Jack Black in the lead role. However, the studio dropped the script idea due to EXTREME negative feedback from fans.
  • In early 1997, Warner Bros. approached cult filmmaker/comic book writer Kevin Smith to script the film. Smith turned down the offer, believing there were other suitable candidates to make a Green Lantern movie.
  • When Greg Berlanti was in charge, he hired comic book writers Michael Green and Marc Guggenheim to work on the script. Share this
  • Zack Snyder was approached to direct the film, but he turned down the offer due to his commitment on Watchmen (2009). He would later accept the offer to direct the reboot of Superman.
  • Not counting the “The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure” or the “Superfriends” shows that were produced by Filmation and Hanna-Barbara, this is only the second D.C. feature where Hal Jordan has a major role. Previously, he only appeared in Green Lantern: First Flight (2009) (V), and beyond that: – in a “Superman” (1996) episode he was only mentioned by name – in “Justice League” (2001) and “Duck Dodgers” (2003) he made cameo appearances in one episode each – and in Justice League: The New Frontier (2008) (V) he played a supporting role.
  • This is the second D.C. feature where John Stewart appears. However, it is only in a minor role: he had previously had a major role in “Justice League” (2001).
  • The Green Lantern uniform is portrayed in computer-generated imagery; this was a creative move by the filmmakers, who wanted the uniform not to be a real cloth outfit but a light construct generated by the Lantern power ring. Notably the comics originally started with Hal Jordan wearing an actual uniform, but later changed it to where his and the other Green Lanterns uniforms were constructs created by their rings. The humanoid actors (Ryan Reynolds, Temuera Morrison and Mark Strong) wore motion-capture suits, over which the uniforms were rendered.
  • Peter Sarsgaard had a prosthetic applied on his head to portray Hector Hammond in the initial stages of his mutation (a swollen brain). For scenes where Hammond’s head actually enlarges it will be done in CGI.
  • It took 4-5 hours to apply the prosthetic make-up to Temuera Morrison to make him resemble Abin Sur.
  • This is editor Stuart Baird‘s third superhero film, having previously worked on Superman (1978) and Superman II (2006) (V) (the Zorro films are debatable).
  • Geoff Johns tried to get the film produced in 2000, but the first question he was asked was whether the film could be made without the ring. This discouraged him so badly that he didn’t make another attempt until The Dark Knight (2008) released.
  • A mannequin of Abin Sur was constructed for Amanda Waller’s autopsy.
  • The comics vary on why the Green Lantern Abin Sur travelled in a spaceship when his ring could sustain him in space. The early comics say it was to prevent unnecessarily using the power on his ring; later versions presented him with a prophecy that his ring would fail him (which ironically came true at the moment his ship malfunctioned).
  • Martin Campbell‘s favorite Green Lantern is Bzzd. He has also said that if he could become a Green Lantern, he would be Kilowog.
  • To prepare for Carol Ferris’s action scenes, Blake Lively underwent training on the The Matrix (1999)‘s aerial stunt rigs, assisted by acrobats from the “Cirque du Soleil” and supervised by noted stunt coordinator Gary Powell. She described it as a great experience: “I’m 40 feet in the air, spiralling around. That’s the best workout you can ever do because it’s all core… You do that for ten minutes and you should see your body the next day! It’s so exhilarating, so thrilling – and nauseating.”
  • Taika Waititi got the role of Thomas “Pieface” Kalmaku due to his Maori-Jewish heritage: “There was an opening in the film for someone who was not-white or not-black.”
  • Peter Sarsgaard described Hector Hammond as an expression of what he keeps inside: “He’s the kid that licked a battery, or went on the roof during a thunderstorm with a coat hanger.”
  • Peter Sarsgaard loved his look as Hector Hammond so much he declared himself the “king of the prostheses!”
  • In the comics, Carol Ferris became the Star Sapphire, an anti-hero with abilities similar to the Green Lantern; she later became a soldier (and currently queen) of the Star Sapphire Corps, a all-female force parallel to the Green Lantern Corps. In the film, Jordan’s nickname for Carol is Sapphire; the Star Sapphire logo can also be seen on Carol’s helmet as she flies her jet.
  • The filmmakers considered making this film about Alan Scott, the original Green Lantern, whose powers were magical rather than cosmic. They decided to go with Hal Jordan as he was the most popular Lantern and the one on whom (most of) the GL universe was constructed around.
  • There will be about 133 VFX shots in the film.
  • Quentin Tarantino was considered to direct this film.
  • Carol Ferris says Hal has the ability to overcome great fear. In the comics this was an amendment of the Green Lantern Corps: one originally had to be without fear in order to be a Lantern, but this was later changed to being able to overcome their fears.
  • The films first teaser trailer borrowed the trailer score from The Last Airbender (2010), which is “Lonely Dusk” performed by Methodic Doubt
  • Hugo Weaving, Jackie Earle Haley and Geoffrey Rush were considered to for the role of Sinestro. Rush went on to voice the Green Lantern Tomar-Re.
  • The “Green Lantern” comic has been greatly inspired by many cinematic figures across history (including the main cast of this film): – Hal Jordan and Carol Ferris (1959) were based on Paul Newman and Elizabeth Taylor – Thaal Sinestro (1961) was based on David Niven – and Hector Hammond (1961) was based on Burl Ives.
  • The primary antagonist in the film was originally going to be the Legion, an alien robot possessing the collective minds of an alien insectoid race. This would have been in keeping with the original comics, where Abin Sur was mortally wounded in a battle with the Legion. However, the Legion was rejected in favour of the fear entity Parallax.
  • An early draft of the script contained a cameo by Alan Scott, the first Green Lantern (Jordan’s predecessor, whose powers were magical rather than cosmic). Scott was going to be the United States President, and near the end would reveal his own past as a Green Lantern to Jordan, and give him his blessing. He was later revised to become an agent of the Checkmate agency (the Checkmate membership stayed true to the comics), who would approach and offer Jordan membership. Later drafts finally wrote him out of the film, and replaced him with Amanda Waller.
  • Kevin Kline was considered for the role of Senator Hammond.
  • In 2007, actor-writer Corey Reynolds sent Warner Bros. a treatment, “Green Lantern: Birth of a Hero”, with him writing and starring as John Stewart (his favourite superhero). Reynolds intended the film to be the first in a trilogy, and was going to introduce Hal Jordan, the Green Lantern Corps and the Justice League in the consecutive sequels. While his pitch was favourably received by the studio, it was abandoned in favour of a story about Hal Jordan.
  • To prepare for his role as Hector Hammond, Peter Sarsgaard spent time with a biologist from Tulane University, who he described as “the most eccentric guy I could find.” They both worked on preparing the lecture Hammond gives in the film.
  • Geoffrey Rush was initially unsure about voicing the alien Tomar-Re, but he had previously voiced avian roles (he had played an owl in Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole (2010) and a pelican in Finding Nemo (2003)), and so when he saw an image of the birdlike Tomar-Re, he accepted the role. He had also noted that he had played various mentor roles before, so felt he would be more than comfortable with the role.
  • The dialogue between Jordan and Sinestro about power batteries was taken verbatim from the “Green Lantern” comic ‘Secret Origin’.
  • A Central City sign can be seen in the film. Central City was the home of Green Lantern’s superhuman ally and close friend, the Flash. Michael Clarke Duncan, who voices Kilowog, is a big fan of the character.
  • The filmmakers increased the budget by $9 million for additional VFX work.

Talking Points:

  • Plot holes?
  • This film got some pretty harsh reviews on opening day.. justified?
  • Opening night surprise…
  • 3D or not to 3D?
  • Which would you prefer – a green ring (will) or a yellow ring (fear)?

What We Learned:

  • If you’re going to bury a super villain in the middle of a planet… it might be smart to put up warning signs
  • Fanboys can really be annoying in the theater – especially when reciting the oath out loud!
  • Blake Lively looks better as a brunette
  • Where can I get me one of those rings?

Trailer:

Recommendations:
Jeff: I really liked it. Sure it wasn’t the greatest superhero movie of all time but it was very enjoyable. Check it out.
Ray: I don’t think it lived up to the hype, but it was entertaining. I think this is one of those where people who are not fans will be more entertained then people who are fans.
Steve: I enjoyed it. I’m really surprised it’s not doing so hot in the box office. Effects were awesome!

The Future: Anonymous (2011)

Director: Roland Emmerich
Starring: Rhys Ifans, Vanessa Redgrave and David Thewlis

Trivia:

Talking Points:

  • Roland Emmerich directs a film that’s not about the end of the world???
  • Does this trailer interest you in the movie or is it more about the topic?

Summary:

Set in the political snake-pit of Elizabethan England, “Anonymous” speculates on an issue that has for centuries intrigued academics and brilliant minds such as Mark Twain, Charles Dickens, and Sigmund Freud, namely: who actually created the body of work credited to William Shakespeare? Experts have debated, books have been written, and scholars have devoted their lives to protecting or debunking theories surrounding the authorship of the most renowned works in English literature. “Anonymous” poses one possible answer, focusing on a time when scandalous political intrigue, illicit romances in the Royal Court, and the schemes of greedy nobles lusting for the power of the throne were brought to light in the most unlikely of places: the London stage.

Trailer:

Excitement:
Jeff: This trailer doesn’t do much for me. The plot does. Still iffy on seeing in the theater verses on DVD.
Ray: While I am interested in the subject matter, this is not a must see in the theatre more for me at all.
Steve: Not my kind of movie. Blech…

Coming Attractions

The Past

The Present

The Future

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MOV036: “I Done Yold You, I’m Strictly Dickly!”

The boys go back in time to resurrect Queen Latifah’s les-bionic performance in “Set It Off”. Seth Rogen gets to play superhero in “The Green Hornet”…was it a hit or should he just stick to schtik comedy? The boys also debate the highly anticipated “Green Lantern” – will the fanboys out there even give it a chance or is it dead before release? The Golden Globes, sequel news and much, much more in this exciting episode of COL Movies!

News:

The Past: Set It Off (1996)

Director: F. Gary Gray

Starring: Jada Pinkett, Queen Latifah, Vivica A. Fox, Kimberly Elise, John C. McGinley

Trivia:

  • Many critics, both positively and negatively, refer to this movie a merging of “Dead Presidents” and “Waiting to Exhale”.
  • 61% fresh on Rotten Tomatoes, with an 85% audience approval rating.
  • A soundtrack containing hip hop and R&B music was released on September 24, 1996 by Eastwest Records. It peaked at #4 on the Billboard 200 and #3 on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums and was certified platinum on November 12, 1996.
  • Critic James Berardinelli wrote, “What sets this movie apart from the innumerable other entries into the action/caper genre is its social perspective. Set It Off doesn’t preach, but you’d have to be blind not to recognize that there’s a message here about the kind of desperation that can result from the familiar cycle of poverty, sexism, and racism.”
  • From scouring the internet for information, it is clear this film was either loved or hated.

Talking Points:

  • Queen Latifah’s performance (If this came out today, do you think she’d get nominated?)
  • Melodrama at it’s finest?
  • Compassion for the characters?

What We’ve Learned:

  • If you’re going to skip the country, throw on a sombrero and jump on a seniors’ bus to Mexico.
  • Don’t hide stolen money in the A/C vent.
  • Cover your face if you’re going to rob a bank!
  • Every bank robbery movie ends with only one member of the gang surviving. (The Town, Takers)

Trailer:

Recommendations:
Jeff: Does every bank robbery movie have to end with all but one of the main characters getting killed?
Ray: I found it cliché, but props to Latifah for an awesome performance.
Steve: See this movie! OK, so it’s overly-melodramatic, but the acting is great and definitely reminds you that women can be just as hard as men! Queen Latifah was outstanding. If you’re a fan of her, this will only make you like her more.

The Present: The Green Hornet

Director: Michel Gondry

Starring: Seth Rogen, Jay Chou, Cameron Diaz, Tom Wilkinson

Trivia:

  • When the rights to the Green Hornet property were purchased by Mirimax, Kevin Smith was attached to write and direct this film. However, Smith pulled out of directing due to an insecurity of directing something with such a larger budget than he was used to. He stayed on as writer and wrote two drafts, but with no further progress with the script, the rights were let go and purchased by Columbia Pictures. Then, coincidentally, his Zack and Miri Make a Porno (2008) star, Seth Rogen, became attached to star and write the screenplay. Smith’s screenplay, however, would resurface later in the form of a comic book miniseries.
  • Seth Rogen shed 30 pounds to play the titular role.
  • In late 2008, Stephen Chow was set to direct and co-star as Kato. However, creative differences prevented him from doing so although, for a while, it seemed he was still set to play Kato when Michel Gondry became attached.
  • The film’s release date was originally the day that an adaptation of another emerald hero was to be released, Green Lantern (2011).
  • Nicolas Cage was in negotiations to play Chudnofsky, but dropped out.
  • ‘The Green Hornet’ was originally a radio show, first broadcast in 1936 and running to 1952. Although there were two serials in the 1940s (13 and 15 chapters, respectively), the last six chapters of the first one re-edited into a 100-minute feature and several episodes of the 1966 TV series were edited together into a pair of 90-minute films, this is the first original feature-length Hollywood treatment of the costumed hero.
  • James Wan was considered to direct before Michel Gondry came aboard.
  • Brit Reid (The Green Hornet) in the radio program was the grandnephew of The Lone Ranger. His father rode with The Lone Ranger on some of his adventures and they shared the family name of Reid.
  • Abbie Cornish was in early talks to play Lenore.
  • Jay Chou improvised the line “I don’t want to touch you” in the trailer.
  • Asian pop star Jay Chou got the role of Kato after a video conference with Seth Rogen was set up. He was invited to do a screen test – the filmmakers did not know he was a famous singer in Asia up until the last moments.
  • Seth Rogen’s first live action film not to be rated R.
  • One of the drawings in Kato’s sketchbook is of Bruce Lee, who played Kato in the 1966 TV series.
  • George Clooney, Jake Gyllenhaal, Mark Wahlberg and Vince Vaughn were previously considered to play the lead role.

Talking Points:

  • Is this another schizo movie?
  • Who should have played The Green Hornet/Britt?
  • Do we think this movie may have suffered from the star being executive producer?

What We Learned:

  • Kato is MUCH cooler than The Green Hornet.
  • Don’t hit on your employees.
  • Knock out gas guns can be very helpful to have around!

Trailer:

Recommendations:
Jeff: I want a sequel. Not because this was a good movie, but because I can see what a good sequel could be. Oh, and bring back Kevin Smith to at least write.
Ray: Had a couple laughs, but to me the best part of this movie will be that I will never have to watch the trailer for this movie again.
Steve: Well, my fears were realized. I’m not going say it was completely awful due to Kato, but it was otherwise a waste of time. Next.

The Future: The Green Lantern (releasing June 17, 2011)

Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Blake Lively, Peter Sarsgaard, Mark Strong

Trivia:

  • Greg Berlanti signed on to co-write and direct the film in 2007, but he stepped down to instead direct This Is Where I Leave You (2011) and handed direction over to Martin Campbell. However, he remained on board as a writer and producer.
  • In the comics, there are currently six people who hold the title of the earth superhero Green Lantern: Alan Scott, Hal Jordan, Guy Gardner, John Stewart, Kyle Rayner and Jade (Scott’s daughter). While this film focuses on Hal Jordan as the primary Green Lantern, Alan Scott, Guy Gardner and John Stewart have cameo appearances to emphasize the ageless presence of the Green Lantern.
  • Sam Worthington and Chris Pine were in consideration for the role of Hal Jordan. Bradley Cooper, Justin Timberlake and Jared Leto also screen-tested for the role before finally, Ryan Reynolds was cast as Jordan.
  • The Green Lantern is one of the few regular DC Universe superhero that is not connected to Superman or Batman to have its own feature film. Other films, such as Catwoman (2004) or Steel (1997), and Supergirl (1984) are spin-offs of Superman and Batman. Watchmen (2009), although a DC Comics adaptation, takes place in a different universe than the regular DC heroes. Swamp Thing (1982) received two films (including the sequel The Return of Swamp Thing (1989) and John Constantine (who debuted in Saga of the Swamp Thing) also had a film with Constantine (2005); though people now associate these two with the Vertigo imprint, John Constantine and the Swamp Thing started in mainstream titles and occasionally still appear in mainstream titles.
  • The casting of Ryan Reynolds creates the rare occasion of an actor who has both played a Marvel Comics and DC Comics superhero. He had previously played Wade Wilson/Deadpool in X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009) and Hannibal King in Blade: Trinity (2004)
  • Brian Austin Green, a fan of the Green Lantern, campaigned actively to get the role of Hal Jordan.
  • The movie was originally scheduled to be shot at Fox Studios in Sydney, Australia but the rising Australian dollar forced the studio and director Martin Campbell to seek relocation, New Orleans and various parishes around the city was chosen because it was it was perfect location from the scouts, the city has perfect aura for filming almost anything, many studio’s are being built in the city now known as Hollywood south and Louisiana tax incentive that many other cities have copied but still not as successful as Louisiana have help make it easy to film big and small budget movies in the State.
  • Keri Russell, Eva Green, Jennifer Garner and Diane Kruger were all considered to play Carol Ferris.
  • Peter Sarsgaard’s casting as Hector Hammond marks him the third actor from Kinsey (2004) to be appear as a character in a Batman movie. The previous ones were Liam Neeson as Henri Ducard in Batman Begins (2005), Chris O’Donnell as Dick Grayson/Robin in Batman Forever (1995) and Batman & Robin (1997), and Sarsgaard’s wife Maggie Gyllenhaal also appears as Rachel Dawes in The Dark Knight (2008).
  • The city of Oa will be designed based on the Emerald City from The Wizard of Oz (1939).
  • Comic book writer Geoff Johns, who has worked on the “Green Lantern” comic and made it a resounding success, was signed on as a creative consultant on the film.
  • At one point Clark Kent/Superman was in the script (he had a cameo as one of the candidates considered to receive a power ring), but he was cut out because the filmmakers didn’t want to depend on another superhero for a success.
  • The scriptwriters drew inspiration from the Green Lantern comics ‘Emerald Dawn’ (which told the story of Hal Jordan’s induction into the Green Lantern Corps and how he became its greatest member) and ‘Secret Origin’ (a modern retelling of Hal Jordan’s early days as a Green Lantern), as well as the work of Denny O’Neil-Neal Adams and Dave Gibbons’ work on the “Green Lantern” comic.
  • A cameo was considered for the Green Lantern John Stewart, but he will instead appear in the film’s sequel as Hal Jordan’s successor/protégé (as seen in the comics).
  • Around June 2006, Robert Smigel had completed a script of the film, which was a comedy-adventure and was to star Jack Black in the lead role. However, the studio dropped the script idea due to EXTREME negative feedback from fans.
  • In early 1997, Warner Bros. approached cult filmmaker/comic book writer Kevin Smith to script the film. Smith turned down the offer, believing there were other suitable candidates to make a Green Lantern movie.
  • When Greg Berlanti was in charge, he hired comic book writers Michael Green and Marc Guggenheim to work on the script.
  • Zack Snyder was approached to direct the film, but he turned down the offer due to his commitment on Watchmen (2009).
  • A prop of the Green Lantern power ring and battery were constructed for the film.
  • Not counting the “The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure” or the “Superfriends” shows that were produced by Filmation and Hanna-Barbara, this is only the second D.C. feature where Hal Jordan has a major role. Previously, he only appeared in Green Lantern: First Flight (2009), and beyond that: – in a “Superman” (1996) episode he was only mentioned by name – in “Justice League” (2001) and “Duck Dodgers” (2003) he made cameo appearances in one episode each – and in Justice League: The New Frontier (2008) he played a supporting role.
  • This is the second D.C. feature starring Alan Scott in a minor role. Previously, he had appeared in “Smallville: Absolute Justice (#9.11)” (2001).
  • This is the second D.C. feature starring Guy Gardner in a minor role. Previously, he had appeared in a “Duck Dodgers” (2003) episode and in “Batman: The Brave and the Bold” (2008).
  • This is the second D.C. feature where John Stewart appears. However, it is only in a minor role: he had previously had a major role in “Justice League” (2001).
  • The GL Corps uniform will be portrayed in computer-generated imagery: Ryan Reynolds and Mark Strong will wear motion-capture suits, over which their uniforms will be rendered. The decision for a computer graphics uniform was a creative move by the filmmakers, who wanted the uniform not to be a real cloth outfit but a light construct generated by Jordan’s power ring.
  • A life-size prop of Abin Sur’s escape pod was constructed for the crash site scene.
  • Peter Sarsgaard had a prosthetic applied on his head to portray Hector Hammond in the initial stages of his mutation (a swollen brain). For scenes where Hammond’s head actually enlarges it will be done in CGI.
  • It took 4-5 hours to apply the prosthetic make-up to Temuera Morrison to make him resemble Abin Sur.
  • This is editor Stuart Baird’s third superhero film, having previously worked on Superman (1978) and Superman II: Restoring the Vision (2006) (the Zorro films are debatable).
  • Geoff Johns tried to get the film produced in 2000, but the first question he was asked was whether the film could be made without the ring. This discouraged him so badly that he didn’t make another attempt until The Dark Knight (2008) released.
  • A mannequin of Abin Sur was constructed for Amanda Waller’s autopsy.
  • The comics vary on why the Green Lantern Abin Sur travelled in a spaceship when his ring could sustain him in space. The early comics say it was to prevent unnecessarily using the power on his ring; later versions presented him with a prophecy that his ring would fail him (which ironically came true at the moment his ship malfunctioned).
  • Martin Campbell’s favorite Green Lantern is Bzzd. He has also said that if he could become a Green Lantern, he would be Kilowog.
  • To prepare for Carol Ferris’s action scenes, Blake Lively underwent training on the The Matrix (1999)’s aerial stunt rigs, assisted by acrobats from the “Cirque du Soleil” and supervised by noted stunt coordinator Gary Powell. She described it as a great experience: “I’m 40 feet in the air, spiralling around. That’s the best workout you can ever do because it’s all core… You do that for ten minutes and you should see your body the next day! It’s so exhilarating, so thrilling – and nauseating.”
  • Taika Waititi got the role of Thomas “Pieface” Kalmaku due to his Maori-Jewish heritage: “There was an opening in the film for someone who was not-white or not-black.”
  • Peter Sarsgaard described Hector Hammond as an expression of what he keeps inside: “He’s the kid that licked a battery, or went on the roof during a thunderstorm with a coat hanger.”
  • Peter Sarsgaard loved his look as Hector Hammond so much he declared himself the “king of the prostheses!”
  • In the comics, Carol Ferris became the Star Sapphire, an anti-hero with abilities similar to the Green Lantern; she later became a soldier (and currently queen) of the Star Sapphire Corps, a all-female force parallel to the Green Lantern Corps . The Star Sapphire logo can be seen on Carol’s helmet as she flies her jet.
  • The filmmakers considered making this film about Alan Scott, the original Green Lantern, whose powers were magical rather than cosmic. They decided to go with Hal Jordan as he was the most popular Lantern and the one on whom (most of) the GL universe was constructed around.
  • There will be about 133 VFX shots in the film.
  • Quentin Tarantino was considered to direct this film.
  • Carol Ferris says Hal has the ability to overcome great fear. In the comics this was an amendment of the Green Lantern Corps: one originally had to be without fear in order to be a Lantern, but this was later changed to being able to overcome their fears.
  • The films first teaser trailer borrowed the trailer score from The Last Airbender (2010), which is “Lonely Dusk” performed by Methodic Doubt.
  • Hugo Weaving, Jackie Earle Haley and Geoffrey Rush were considered to for the role of Sinestro.
  • The different Green Lanterns from Earth were created using real people: Alan Scott, created in July 1940 by Martin Nodell and Bill Finger, was based on Alan Ladd. In fact, his complete name is Alan Ladd Wellington Scott; Hal Jordan, created in October 1959 by John Broome and Gil Kane, was based on Paul Newman. His complete name is Harold ‘Hal’ Jordan; Guy Gardner, created in March 1968 by John Broome and Gil Kane, was based on Martin Milner. Although he has the same name that a NASA’s astronaut, his name became after fan Guy H. Lillian III and writer Gardner Fox. His complete name is Guy Darrin Gardner; John Stewart, created in December 1971 by Neal Adams and Dennis O’Neil, was based on Sidney Poitier; and Kyle Rayner, created in January 1994 by Ron Marz and Darryl Banks, was based on Keanu Reeves. In addition, John Broome and Gil Kane created too Carol Ferris in September 1959 (after Elizabeth Taylor), Hector Hammond in March 1961 (after Burl Ives) and Sinestro in August 1961 (after David Niven).
  • As well as Alan Scott, Hal Jordan, Guy Gardner, John Stewart and Kyle Rayner, in September 1967 John Broome and Gil Kane created other Green Lantern from Earth called Charles ‘Charlie’ Vicker. He was an actor who portrayed Green Lantern in a TV show and that briefly had Jordan’s power ring, helping to this last one in a real adventure. Named Green Lantern honorary by the Guardians of the Universe, he was assigned to the Sector 3319. When the Green Lantern Corps were destroyed he joined other organization called Darkstars (created by The Controllers, a split from the Guardians), dying finally during the invasion of the planet Rann by Grayven, third son of Darkseid (July 1996). Vicker was based on Warren Beatty after the release of Bonnie and Clyde (1967) one month ago of Vicker’s first appearance. Due to his low popularity levels his appearances were always shorts along the years before the editors decided to kill him.
  • In the comics Jordan is a captain of the US Air Force, nicknamed “Highball”, who serves in the Edwards Air Force Base and that he’s helped by General Jonathan “Herc” Stone and his fellow pilot Jillian “Cowgirl” Perlman, that both know about Jordan as Green Lantern. In addition, Jordan and Perlman live a sporadic romance, making it a doubt in Jordan to choose between Perlman and Ferris, but all this have been vanished for the movie. Stone and Perlman were created in 2005 by Geoff Johns and they were based on Patrick Bauchau and Gwyneth Paltrow respectively.
  • In the comics, the Checkmate organization (of which Amanda Waller and Alan Scott are agents) is specializes in covert operations. In the film, it is seen as a supervising agency (similar to S.H.I.E.L.D. or Sector Seven).
  • Originally, the primary antagonist in the film was to be the Legion, an alien armored robot. The script, when revised, removed the Legion and substituted it with the fear entity Parallax. This was part of a long-term strategy for successive films: Sinestro would be corrupted by Parallax and form his own Corps with Parallax as its power source, while other entities of emotional power (the Butcher, Ophidian, Ion, Adara, Proselyte and the Predator) and their Corps would make their presence known.
  • The comics differ over what caused Abin Sur’s mortal crash-landing on Earth. The original story says his ship was rendered inoperative by yellow radiation that surrounded the Earth; later comics mention his ship was damaged from a battle with a Red Lantern. The film combines both versions (battle within a field of yellow radiation), thus enabling the possibility of the Red Lantern Corps appearing in future films.
  • In the comics, Hal Jordan was possessed by the fear entity Parallax and went on a rampage throughout Earth. In the film this happens to Hector Hammond.

Talking Points:

  • Comparisons between film and comics – will they be justified or should we just let it be a feature film that stands on its own?

Summary:
A test pilot is granted a mystical green ring that bestows him with otherworldly powers, as well as membership into an intergalactic squadron tasked with keeping peace within the universe.

Trailer:

Excitement:
Jeff: Hoping for the best, expecting the worst.
Ray: I’m not digging the comedic tone of the trailer, but Ill go see it.
Steve: Definitely interested in seeing it. Visuals look great! Just hoping they don’t try too hard to throw in catch phrases or cutesy lines.

Coming Attractions:
The Past

The Present

The Future


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MOV020: “That Man… is a Brownie Hound.”

With a slow news week, we get into an amazing show featuring the 80’s classic “The Breakfast Club,” the Ben Affleck directed “The Town”, and the mind blowing “Sucker Punch” trailer. Slaine . . . is fucking gorgeous.

News:

The Past: The Breakfast Club

Director: John Hughes

Starring: Ally Sheedy, Emilio Estevez, Judd Nelson, Molly Ringwald, Anthony Michael Hall

Trivia:

  • Emilio Estevez was originally going to play Bender, but Hughes couldn’t find someone to play Andrew Clark so Emilio agreed to play Clark.
  • The Hallway, interior shots and the famous ending stroll through the football field were shot at Glenbrook North High School, John Hughes Alma mater
  • This like many of John Hughes film’s takes place in ficticious “Shermer, Illinois” But are based on the towns of Glenwood and Northbrook, Illinois where Hughes grew up. Until 1924 Northbrook, IL was called Shermerville Illinois
  • The exterior shots and library set was built inside the gymnasium of then closed school Main North High School, in Des Plains, IL before it was bought by the Illinois state police and turned into a police station
  • John Hughes appears briefly in a cameo as Brian’s father

Talking Points:

  • Who do/did you Identify with?
  • Is the dubbed TV version funnier than the original?
  • Andy calling Bender a “faggot”

What We’ve Learned:

  • Cutting class to go shopping does not make you a defective
  • All monkey business is ill advised
  • Claire is a fat girls name (Really? Have you seen Claire Danes?)
  • Everyone’s home life is unsatisfying
  • We are all pretty Bizarre, some are just better at Hiding it.
  • Emilio Estevez should not dance

Trailer:

Recommendations:
Jeff: It’s a classic, there’s no way for me NOT to recommend this.
Ray: If you have not seen this movie, please email me so i can come over and slap you.
Steve: Ultimate teenage angst and strangers become friends movie. Classic.

The Present: The Town

Director: Ben Affleck

Starring: Ben Affleck, Rebecca Hall, Jon Hamm, Jeremy Renner, Blake Lively, Titus Welliver, Pete Postlethwaite, Chris Cooper, Slaine

Trivia:

  • Every Boston Police cruiser shown in the film comes from the fictional district A-8, which also existed in Boston’s Finest (2010)
  • Shipped to theaters under the code name “Criminal Intent”.
  • The movie was shown at the Venice Film Festival and premiered at Boston’s Fenway Park.
  • The former MASSBank branch located in Melrose, Massachusetts was used as the location for the first robbery of the film, taking on the name Cambridge Merchants Bank (the exterior shots, however, are of Cambridge Savings Bank in Harvard Square).
  • Filming also took place at Mohegan Sun in Uncasville, Connecticut for casino scenes and Massachusetts Correctional Institution – Cedar Junction in Walpole, Massachusetts for use of their visiting room.
  • A voice in the trailer of the movie says: “There are over 300 bank robberies in Boston every year. Most of these professionals live in a 1-square-mile neighborhood called Charlestown.” In fact, there were 23 reported bank robberies in the entire state of Massachusetts in the first quarter of 2010, compared with 49 in Illinois and 136 in California, according to the FBI.

Talking Points:

  • Who did you root for in this movie?
  • Ben Affleck as a director? Voted best new filmmaker in 2007
  • Which is better, The Town or Takers?

What We Learned:

  • Slaine is fucking gorgeous.
  • Always ask a cop to see his ID
  • Masks are creepy
  • Every 6 year old in Charlestown can spot a undercover cop
  • If you see Skeletor come into a bank, get on the ground

Trailer:

Recommendations:
Jeff: Slaine is fucking gorgeous.
Ray: Great movie.. the way a heist movie should be. Makes takers look even more like crap.
Steve: Really enjoyed it. Even without any “r”s in the entire movie.

The Future: Sucker Punch

Director: Zack Snyder

Starring: Emily Browning, Vanessa Hudgens, Abbie Cornish, Jena Malone, Jamie Chung

Trivia:

  • Zack Snyder’s first film that is not based on another work. Dawn of the Dead (2004) was a remake of a 1978 film by ‘George A. Romero’. Both 300 (2006) and Watchmen (2009) were based on graphic novels. And Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole (2010) is based on a children’s fantasy book. However, the film does heavily feature motifs from Lewis Carroll’s book Alice in Wonderland – the movie’s logline while being pitched to studios was even “Alice in Wonderland with machine guns.”
  • Zack Snyder told Vanessa Hudgens that this feature would be his first action movie, despite the fact that 300 (2006) is considered an action movie.

Summary:
A young girl, confined to a mental institution by her stepfather who plans to have her lobotomized in five days time, creates an imaginary world to plan her escape.

Trailer:

IGN Rewind Theater Analysis:

Excitement:
Jeff: Stoked
Ray: Steampunk, Katanas, Mobsters, Dragons.. oh my.
Steve: Looks like it will be interesting. Effects look amazing.

Coming Attractions

The Past: The Howling
The Present: Let Me In
The Future: My Soul To Take

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